Newsletter No. 95 (EN)

 

 

 

 

 

How to Terminate

a Thai Employment Agreement

 

January 2016

 

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information provided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

The most important laws governing the rights and duties of employers and employees in Thailand are the Labour Protection Act (“LPA“), the Civil and Commercial Code

(“CCC“), the Labour Relations Act (“LRA“) and the Unfair Contract Terms Act

 

(“UCTA“).

 

Terminating employment contracts can lead to two different consequences:

 

  • Employment termination on the grounds specified under Sec. 119 LPA, such as gross negligence, wilful disobedience, dishonesty or criminal acts of the employee results in the employer’s right to terminate the em-ployment without notice and/or compensation.

 

  • If the employment is terminated for any other reasons, the employer is ob-ligated to make severance payment and to comply with notice periods.

 

 

  • Termination without Severance Pay

 

Termination due to a wrongdoing or miscon-duct of the employee is governed by Section 583 CCC and Section 119 LPA, according to which the following circumstances may result in a termination without notice or severance pay:

 

  • Dishonestly performing his/her duty or intentionally committing a criminal offense against the employer;

 

  • Intentionally causing damage to the employer;

 

  • Negligently causing serious damage to the employer;


 

  • Violation of working regulations, rules, or lawful orders of the employer after a written warning has been given by the employer; in serious cases, the employer is not required to give any warning;

 

  • Neglecting duty (being absent from work) for 3 consecutive working days without justifiable reason;

 

  • Being imprisoned by a final judgment of imprisonment, except for petty and negligence offence.

 

NOTICE: Any termination on grounds other than those specified above will be treated as termination with severance pay (please see section 2 below).

 

In case an employee violates working regulations, rules or does not obey a law-ful order of the employer, it is important for an employer to issue a warning letter in writing. The employer shall have the right to dismiss such employee only if such employee commits a violation on the same grounds as indicated in the warning letter. Such warning letter shall be valid for one year from the time of the violation.

 

Only in severe violation cases, an em-ployee can be immediately dismissed without a prior written warning.

 

EXAMPLE: If the employee receives a written warning for late attendance on 31 December 2015, the employee may be dismissed without severance pay for a second late attendance only if it occurs before 31 December 2016.

 

The Supreme Court imposes a strict bur-den of written notification on the em-ployer.

 

EXAMPLE: A dismissed employee has offered a written confession of wrongdo-ing with promises not to repeat the wrongdoing and has further acknowl-edged to have received verbal warnings from his employer prior to the termina-tion.

 

The Supreme Court ruled that this pro-cedure should not be deemed as a written warning. Even in this case, an actual writ-ten warning from the employer must be issued before terminating the employ-ment.

 

Such warning letter must:

 

  • be issued by the employer or an authorised representative;

 

  • describe the wrongdoing or the misconduct clearly and precisely;

 

  • contain a warning sentence that the employee shall not repeat the same wrongdoing/misconduct again, as well as the monition that ignoring such warning and re-peating the misconduct may re-sult in the termination of the em-ployment.

 

For the completeness of the warning let-ter, it should:

 

  • provide the facts relating to the employee’s wrongdoing or mis-conduct;

 

  • refer to the specific provision in the employer’s working rules or code of conduct so that the em-ployee is adequately informed of what provision applies to the employee’s case.

 

However, there is no requirement that the warning letter should actually contain a caption or heading stating the term

 

“warning letter“. It will be considered valid as long as it contains the necessary information or provisions as stated above as it is the content of the notice that is determinative.

 

CONSEQUENCES:

 

  • Once an effective written warn-ing has been issued to an em-ployee but the employee refuses to correct the behaviour, the em-ployer may terminate the contract without providing statutory sev-erance pay (Section 119 (4) LPA).

 

  • However, this does not apply to terminations due to unsatisfac-tory performance: If an employee has been warned in writing about the job performance and does not improve, the employer can terminate the employment but may still be obliged to pay the employee statutory severance pay.

 

In the event of retrenchment due to re-structuring (only due to the use of ma-chine instead of personnel or changing of machinery or technology), the employer must inform the labour inspector and the employees of the grounds for termina-tion and the names of the employees af-fected at least 60 days in advance of the date of termination of employment. There are further duties of the employer in this respect which should be discussed with a legal professional on a case-by-case basis.

 

NOTE: It is important to issue a written warning in case of an employee violating company rules and/or refuses to follow an employer’s lawful orders/instructions. This will assure that a repetition of such action by the employee can be a reason for termination.

 

For more details on how to issue a proper warning letter, please refer to our

 

 

 

  1. Termination with Severance Pay

 

If the termination of employment does not fall under one of the causes men-tioned in Section 119 LPA above, it is compulsory under employment laws that the employer provides the employee statutory severance pay and payment for unused annual leave (as well as any other payments due under the employment agreement and the employer’s working rules and regulations/policies).

 

The employer is further required to pro-vide advance notice of termination to the affected employee or make additional payment in lieu of such advance notice.

 

NOTE: A contract with a definite period terminates at the end of such period without notice to be given; however, sev-erance pay has to be paid unless there was a specific reason for the limitation of the agreement (e.g. clearly defined project work) as allowed under Section 118 LPA.

 

Severance pay varies depending on the length of the employee’s uninterrupted service as follows and is based on the last wage rate:

120 days > 1 year

= 30 days

1 year > 3 years

= 90 days

3 years > 6 years

=180 days

6 years > 10 years

=240 days

10 years and over

=300 days

 

Furthermore, salary, payment for work on holiday, overtime and overtime on holiday pay has to be paid to the em-ployee as well. These types of payments have to be paid to the employee within 3 days after the termination of the em-ployment.

 

Thai law requires that a notice of termi-nation must be given at or before the

 

time of actual wage payment in order to take effect as of the following wage pay-ment.

 

EXAMPLE: An employer wishes to ter-minate the employment at the end of the following month and the employee actu-ally receives his wages at the 25th of each month.

 

The employer, therefore, must provide a notice of termination to the employee on or before the actual wage payment date of any given month, e.g. if the employer wishes to terminate the employment ef-fective at the end of July, the employer must notify the employee on or before 25 June.

 

A longer notice period can be agreed upon in the employment agreement or the employer’s working rules and regula-tion. The maximum notice period for the employee is 3 months. It is possible to agree upon different notice periods for the employer and the employee.

 

Alternatively, a termination notice with immediate effect may be delivered to the employee if a payment in lieu of advance notice is simultaneously made to the em-ployee. The amount of such remunera-tion in lieu equals the wages the em-ployee would have been entitled to dur-ing the advance notice period required by law, the employment agreement or the employer’s working rules and regulations.

 

  1. Additional Obligations of the Em-ployer after Termination

 

The employee is entitled to ask for a cer-tificate of employment which indicates the length and nature of his or her ser-vices (Section 585 CCC).

 

Further, if the employer has borne the costs of an employee’s journey originat-ing from a place other than the place of work, the employee can also claim the return costs upon termination of the contract if the following three conditions are met:

 

  • the applicable contract does not provide otherwise;

 

  • the contract has not been termi-nated due to an act or fault of the employee; and

 

  • the employee returns within a reasonable time to the place from where he/she was transported.

 

  • Unfair Termination

 

Generally, an employer should aim to avoid confrontations about whether an employment was terminated unfairly, re-spectively to ensure that such submission will not prevail.

 

Thai law does itself not define what con-stitutes an unfair termination of em-ployment. However, there are numerous Thai Supreme Court decisions on this issue. Summarising court judgments, an unfair termination of employment may be defined as follows:

 

  • a dismissal without cause or with an unreasonable cause;

 

  • a cause which is not as severe as to warrant a dismissal;

 

  • a cause which lies outside the company’s work rules or the em-ployment contract;

 

  • a dismissal in which an alleged offence of an employee cannot be proved or in which an em-ployee has committed no offence; or

 

  • a dismissal which is intended to harass or persecute an employee.

 

  1. Consequences of Unfair Termina-tion

 

Unfair termination can lead to one of the following two consequences:

 

  • If the labour court considers that an employee has been unfairly dismissed, the court may order reinstatement of employment at the level of remuneration apply-ing at the time of the dismissal; or

 

  • If a labour court considers that the cooperation between em-ployer and employee has been disrupted beyond repair, the court may fix an amount of dam-ages as a compensation to be paid by the employer. The labour court will take into consideration the age of the employee, the length of service, the hardship of the employee at the time of dis-missal, the cause of the dismissal and the compensation the em-ployee is entitled to receive. Such compensation is generally granted in addition to the legally required severance pay.

 

Disputes regarding termination of em-ployment must be brought before a la-bour court. If the place of work is Bang-kok Metropolis or its surrounding prov-inces, the Central Labour Court has to be addressed. Otherwise, a regional or pro-vincial labour court has to be approached if one has been established in the region or province of the place of work; if the place of work is not situated within the territorial jurisdiction of any labour court, the Court of First Instance is competent.

 

NOTE: Labour cases do not incur any court fee and the labour court office can help the employee draft the complaint to be lodged to the labour court. Therefore, the employee can file the labour case free of charge which is advantageous to the employee but quite unfavourable to the employer.

 

Employers and employees may issue a power of attorney to proceed on their behalf to the employers’ association or the labour union of which they are mem-bers, or to the competent officer em-powered to take legal action.

 

NOTE: Even though an employment is terminated with severance pay, it is im-portant to have actual reasons for such termination (which can be later proved in the court, as the case may be) and to state them explicitly in the termination letter. These reasons should be based on realis-tic grounds as an employer bears the burden of proof for such grounds. If possible, an amicable solution or a resig-nation letter is always a preferable option.

 

  1. b) Examples for Unfair Termination

 

The following judgements are examples for an unfair dismissal:

 

  1. An employee had committed 11 counts of wrongdoings, some of which warranted a dismissal by the employer. However, the employer did not dismiss the employee by rea-son of the wrongdoing, but elected to impose a lighter disciplinary ac-tion against him. Subsequently, after the employee had failed to report to work for one day, the employer de-cided to dismiss the employee; the dismissal was also made in reliance on the employee’s previous wrong-doings.

 

The court held the dismissal as an unfair termination of employment because the court found that the employer had no intention in penal-ising (i.e. dismissing) the employee at the time the past wrongdoings oc-curred. Therefore, the employer could no longer rely on the past wrongdoings to dismiss the em-ployee.

 

(Thai Supreme Court Judgment No. 3574/2526)

 

  • A company’s organisation had been restructured in order to be more


competitive. The downsizing had been based on the results of an as-sessment test.

 

The court ruled that such termina-tion was unfair as the test result did not show an underperformance of the respective employees.

(Thai Supreme Court Judgment No. 6068-6069/2545)

 

  • As a general rule, the fairness of termination of employment has to be judged according to a reasonable cause for the termination in conjunc-tion with the work rules of the com-pany which are regarded as an agreement on the condition of em-ployment between the employer and the employees.

 

(Thai Supreme Court Judgment No. 7492/2542)

 

  • The employer ordered the employee to change the employer and to work for another company in the group but the employee did not agree to sign the new agreement. The em-ployer then terminated the employ-ment. The court ruled that this was a case of an unfair termination.

 

(Thai Supreme Court Judgment No. 46/2537)

 

  • In case of termination for retrench-ment, if the court finds that the company does not actually experi-ence substantial losses, or only a loss in profit, such termination shall be deemed as an unfair termination.

 

(Thai Supreme Court Judgment No. 1850/2547)

 

  1. Examples for Fair Termination

 

The following judgements did not find an unfair dismissal:

 

  • A hotel management work rule with respect to the handling of keys re-quired that maids would hang them round their necks or waists and that they may not be left elsewhere nor lent to any other person.

 

The employer’s dismissal of a maid who lost the keys to all the rooms on the 6th floor was not deemed to be unfair. The court held the loss of the keys constituted a material breach of the work rules.

 

(Thai Supreme Court Judgment No. 3416/2525)

 

  • A termination of employment on the basis of unsatisfactory work per-formance records is generally not considered to be unfair.

(Thai Supreme Court Judgments Nos. 2914-2915/2523, 3538/2524, and 2671/2527)

 

  1. Checklist

 

The following checklist may help to pre-pare the termination of an employment and to avoid common pitfalls:

 

  • Issue a warning letter which ex-plicitly states the misconduct in case an employee violates working rules or regulations, or does not obey a lawful order of the employer. Make sure that such warning letter also states that any repetition may lead to a termination. Further, make the employee sign such warning letter in order to acknowledge the receipt, keep a copy and make sure that you have a witness.

Even if a certain misconduct does not justify an immediate termination, a warning letter makes sure that the employment can be terminated in case of a repetition and may avoid additional compensation for unfair termination.

 

  • Collect evidence for such mis-conduct.

 

An employer should always keep in mind to bear the burden of proof for all reasons which lead to a termi-nation of the employment.

 

  • Issue the termination letter in writing, make the employee sign on the letter and keep a copy as evi-dence.

Even though this is not explicitly re-quired by law, the employer has to prove the date of the termination.

 

  • State the reason for the termina-tion in the termination letter, be aware that the employee might ques-tion such reason and that he/she might possibly file a claim for unfair termination. In case the misconduct results in damages to the company, state this fact as well. All reasons should be listed as the employer will be precluded from raising such rea-sons afterwards.

 

As a consequence, only reasons which can be proved and for which the employer has evidence should be stated.

 

  • Make sure that any salary, holi-day and overtime pay (if any) as well as severance pay (if any) is paid.

 

  • Make also sure that the employee signs a receipt confirming the set-tlement of any such payment upon receipt. Preferably let the employee sign the resignation letter as well.

 

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 100 (DE)

Newsletter Nr. 100         (DE)

 

 

 

Besteuerung von nicht chinesischen Gehältern in China lebender Expatriates

 

Dezember  2014

 

 Obwohl Lorenz & Partners größtmögliche Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in dieser Broschüre bereitgestellten In-formationen stets auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass dies eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen kann. Lorenz & Partners übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit, Vollständigkeit oder Qualität der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners, welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorlieg.

 

  1. Einleitung

Eine häufig von in China lebenden Ex-patriates gestellte Frage ist die nach der Steuer- oder Deklarationspflicht auslän-discher Einkünfte in China.

 

Unter ausländischen Einkünften sollen hier nur solche Einkünfte verstanden werden, die aus unselbständiger Tätig-keit erzielt werden und von einem nicht chinesischen Unternehmen getragen werden. D.h. Einkünfte, die zwar im Ausland gezahlt werden, aber von einem ausländischen Unternehmen anschlie-ßend an das chinesische Unternehmen weiterbelastet werden.

 

In der Regel handelt es sich um Situatio-nen, in denen der Expat mehrere Anstellungsverhältnisse hat, was insbe-sondere in Führungspositionen nicht unüblich ist. Typische Fälle sind die ei-nes Managing Directors einer chinesi-schen Gesellschaft, der gleichzeitig auch für das Asiengeschäft der Unterneh-mensgruppe zuständig ist und hierfür einen Vertrag mit der chinesischen Tochtergesellschaft und auch mit der Muttergesellschaft oder einer anderen regionalen Gesellschaft (z.B. in Hong-kong) hat.

 

Es ist zu unterscheiden zwischen der Steuerpflicht und der Deklarati-onspflicht ausländischer Einkünfte. Au-ßerdem kommt grundsätzlich die Abgabe von zwei verschiedenen Steuer-erklärungen in Betracht. Die monatliche

 

 

 

Erklärung regelt die eigentliche Besteue-rung, da der chinesische Steuertarif auf die monatlichen Einkünfte abstellt. Des Weiteren ist in bestimmten Fällen und seit 2007 noch eine Jahreserklärung in China abzugeben, die eher der Prüfung der bereits monatlich erklärten chinesischen Einkünfte sowie der De-klaration ausländischer Einkünfte dient.

 

  • Steuerberechnung für Expats die sich kein volles Jahr in China aufhalten

Expatriates, die keinen Wohnsitz in China haben und die weniger als 90 Ta-ge in China leben (bzw. weniger als 183 Tage soweit ein Doppelbesteuerungs-abkommen zur Anwendung kommt), werden nur mit ihrem auf China entfal-lenden Einkommen besteuert (sog.

 

„time apportionment“), d.h. nur mit dem Einkommen, welches sie für ihre Arbeit in China von einem chinesischen Arbeitgeber erhalten. Der Ein-kommensteuer unterliegen (nur) die Einkünfte, die sich auf die tatsächliche Arbeitszeit in China beziehen und die von in China ansässigen Unternehmen gezahlt oder getragen wurden.

 

Bei der Berechnung der monatlichen Einkommenssteuer wird gemäß Guo Shui Fa [2004] Nr. 97 in Verbindung mit Guo Shui Fa [1994] Nr. 148 sowohl das Einkommen von innerhalb als auch das Einkommen von außerhalb Chinas in der Steuerberechnung berücksichtigt und auf die Tage umgelegt, für welche

 

 der Arbeitnehmer tatsächlich in China gearbeitet hat. Gemäß Guo Shui Fa [2004] Nr. 97 in Verbindung mit Guo Shui Fa [1994] Nr. 148 erfolgt die Be-steuerung nach der folgenden Formel:

 

Abzuführende monatliche Einkommensteuer =

 

(steuerbares Einkommen aus Löhnen und Gehältern innerhalb und außerhalb Chinas X anwendbarer Steuersatz – quick calculation deduction)

 

X

 

(Gehalt, das im Monat für die Tätigkeit in China gezahlt wurde, geteilt durch gesamtes Gehalt, das im Monat für Tätigkeiten innerhalb und außerhalb Chinas gezahlt wurde)

 

X

 

(Arbeitstage in China im Monat geteilt durch Anzahl Tage des Monats)

 

 

 

Dies bedeutet im Grundsatz, dass auch ausländische Einkünfte gegenüber der chinesischen Steuerbehörde anzugeben sind, so dass anhand der Summe des chinesischen und des ausländischen Ge-halts, abzüglich des Freibetrags der Steuersatz und der Abzugsbetrag (soge-nannte Quick Calculation Deduction oder „QCD“) zu bestimmen sind (ähn-lich dem Progressionsvorbehalt in Deutschland).

 

Folglich müssen die ausländischen Ein-künfte im Rahmen der Steuerermittlung berücksichtigt werden, auch wenn sie unter Umständen nicht versteuert wer-den müssen.

 

III. Jahressteuererklärung

Abgabepflicht

 

 

Eine Jahressteuererklärung hat ab-zugeben, wer

 

  • ein Jahresgehalt von über 120.000 RMB (ca. 13.000 EUR) erhält und ein volles Jahr in China wohnte (die Be-dingung des vollen Jahres erfüllt nicht, wer über 30 Tage am Stück oder über 90 Tage verteilt über das

 

 

Kalenderjahr außerhalb Chinas verbracht hat) oder

  • Einkünfte von mehr als einem Arbeitgeber erhält oder
  • andere ausländische Einkünfte erhält oder
  • Einkünfte erzielt, für die es keinen sogenannten withholding agent gibt.

 

Die Abgabefrist für a), b) und d) ist der 31. März des Folgejahres. Die Abgabe-frist für c) ist der 30. Januar des Folgejahres.

 

Die Auslegung dieser Regelung ist lo-kal sehr unterschiedlich, daher sollten die tatsächliche Abgabepflicht der Jahreserklärung, der zu erklärende In-halt sowie das Abgabedatum jeweils lokal geprüft werden und lokale Ex-perten hinzugezogen werden. Im Formular der jährlichen Einkommen-steuererklärung ist eine gesonderte Spalte für Einkommen außerhalb Chinas enthalten (siehe Anlage).

 

 

  1. Angabe von ausländischen Einkünften gemäß den vorläufigen Regelungen zur Abgabe von ESt-Erklärungen

Es ist

geregelt, wann ausländische Ein-

künfte

an

die

chinesischen

 

Steuerbehörden zu erklären sind, falls bereits im Ausland Steuern auf diese Einkünfte bezahlt wurden. Demnach ist in China eine entsprechende Steuerer-klärung bei dem für den Steuerzahler zu-ständigen Finanzamt abzugeben, wenn die Steuer auf der Basis des entspre-chenden Steuerjahres fällig wird. Wenn die Steuer bei Zufluss der Einkünfte fäl-lig wird, ist die Erklärungspflicht in China der 30. Januar des Jahres, das dem Zuflussjahr folgt. Dasselbe gilt im Fall, dass auf der Basis des ausländischen Steuerrechts oder eines Doppelbesteue-rungsabkommens die Einkünfte in

 

China freigestellt und damit steuerfrei sind.

 

  1. Fazit

Die Angabepflicht für ausländische Ein-künfte entspricht der international üblichen Praxis. Die Finanzverwaltun-gen nutzen solche Informationen auch bereits, um Kontrollmitteilungen an an-dere Finanzverwaltungen weiterzugeben. Es ist daher darauf zu achten, diese Ein-künfte in korrekter Weise in Steuer-erklärungen zu berücksichtigen.

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANLAGE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

个人所得税年度申报表

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX ANNUAL RETURN 纳税月份:

 

 

自 年 月 日至  年 月  日

 

 

填表日期:

年  月  日

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taxable month:From  date

month___year

Date of filling   date

 

month   year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to  date

 

month

 

year

金额单位:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

人民币元 Monetary unit:RMB Yuan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

纳税人编码:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tax payer’s file number:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

纳税人姓

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

国籍

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

抵华日期

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tax payer’s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

在中国境内

省、市、县、街道及号数(包括公寓号码)Street name and number(including number of apart-

 

 

 

住址

 

 

ment.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Address in

 

 

 

 

公寓 Apartment

 

 

 

街道 Street

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

China

 

 

 

 

县/市 County/City

 

省 Province

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

在中国境内通讯地址(如非上述住

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

邮编

 

 

 

 

电话

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

址)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

职业

 

 

 

 

 

 

服务单

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

服务地点

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Profession

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

中国境内所得已纳税额 Amount of income tax paid

境外所得应纳税额 Tax on income from sources

 

 

in China

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

outside China

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

所得项目

 

所得

应纳税

 

已纳所

 

自缴或扣

所得项目

收入额

减费用额

应纳税

速算扣

应纳

境外已

 

 

Categories

 

期间

所得额

 

得税额

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

所得额

 

除数

所得

缴税额

 

 

of income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

self-report-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

税额

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 100 (DE)

Newsletter No. 100          (EN)

 

 

 

 

 

Taxation of foreign sourced salaries of Expats living in China

 

 

 

December 2014

 

 

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays greatest attention on updating the information provided in this newsletter we cannot take responsibility for the topicality, completeness or quality of the information pro-vided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliber-ately or grossly negligent.

 

 

  1. Introduction

A question regularly raised by expats liv-ing in China refers to the taxation and declaration obligations of their foreign sourced salary income in China.

 

The relevant salaries are typically paid and borne by a foreign (group) com-pany. This is typically a situation where the expat has two or more functions and employment contracts, often one with a local Chinese entity and one with a re-gional entity (Hong Kong) or the foreign mother company.

 

This normally arises in situations where one employee has several employment contracts with the same company group, which is quite common for leading posi-tions such as director, general manager, etc. For instance, the director of the lo-cal Chinese subsidiary has a contract with this Chinese entity, but has also an employment contract with the German mother company or a Hong Kong com-pany for business development in Asia

 

A differentiation needs to be made be-tween the obligation to declare income and the actual taxation.

 

Generally, two different tax returns have to be made. A monthly tax return being

 

the basis for the monthly Individual In-come Tax (IIT) payment. This return has to be filed with the tax office by the 7th day of the following month. Furthermore, an annual return has to be filed generally by 31 March of the following year.

 

  • Tax Computation for non-domiciled employees

Expatriates, without a domicile in China and who have resided in China for less than 90 days in a year or less than 183 days where a double taxation agreement applies, are taxable under China IIT only with regard to their China sourced income („time apportionment“). Only that portion of the income is taxable in China which is received for the actual work performed in China and which is paid or borne by a Chinese employer.

 

However, in the computation of month-ly IIT, both the income from within China as well as the portion from off-shore needs to be taken into consideration.

 

According to Guo Shui Fa [2004] No. 97 in connection with Guo Shui Fa [1994] No. 148 the computation of the IIT is as follows:

 

Individual Income Tax payable =

 

(amount of taxable income derived from wages and salaries earned in and outside China in the current month X applicable tax rate – quick calculation deduction)

 

X

 

(wages paid for working in China in the current month divided by total wages paid for working in and outside China in the current month)

 

X

 

(number of working days in China in the current month divided by number of days in the current month)

 

 

This formula is applicable for all non-Chinese including senior management.

 

So generally, foreign income has to be included in the calculation for the de-termination of the taxable income and the IIT and is thus part of the IIT decla-ration with regards to the time apportionment, despite that no tax has to be paid on the foreign income.

 

III. Annual IIT Filing

An annual tax return has to be filed by foreign employees who

 

  • receive a salary above RMB 120,000 RMB (approx. EUR 13,000) and reside in China for a full year. The requirement of a full year residence is not fulfilled where a person spends more than 30 days in one trip outside of China or spends in total more than 90 days during a calendar year out-side of China or

 

  • receives income from more than one employer or
  • receives other foreign sourced in-come or
  • receives income for which there is no withholding agent.

 

In the case of a), b) and d), the filing deadline is 31 March of the following

 

year. In case of c), the filing deadline is 30 January of the following year.

 

This regulation is being applied slightly differently in various locations. It is therefore advisable to check with the in charge tax office and with local experts when to file and what to declare in the return.

 

The annual filing form has a separate column to declare non-China sourced income (see attachment).

 

  1. Declaration of non-China sourced Income according to the “Provisional

Measures on the Personal Lodging of Individual

Income Tax”

 

Also, non-China sourced income has to be declared in China for cases where tax has already been paid in another coun-try. The taxpayer has to file a tax return with his in charge tax office within 30 days after the end of the foreign tax year. This applies in cases where the tax becomes due upon the end of the for-eign tax year. If the tax is due in the foreign country at the time of receiving the income, then the tax filing is due on 30 January of the year following the re-ceipt of the income. This also applies in

 

 

case  the  income  is  tax  exempt  in  the

 

 

 

foreign country.

 

 

 

  1. Summary

Non-China sourced income has to be considered in various circumstances in the Chinese tax declarations. This is sim-ilar to international standards. Such information is increasingly being used to do information exchange with tax au-thorities in other countries. It is therefore highly important to prepare such tax declarations in accordance with all regulations and compliance require-ments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

个人所得税年度申报表

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX ANNUAL RETURN 纳税月份:

 

 

自 年 月 日至  年 月  日

 

 

填表日期:

年  月  日

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taxable month:From  date

month___year

Date of filling   date

 

month   year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to  date

 

month

 

 

year

金额单位:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

人民币元 Monetary unit:RMB Yuan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

纳税人编码:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tax payer’s file number:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

纳税人姓

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

国籍

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

抵华日期

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tax payer’s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

在中国境内

省、市、县、街道及号数(包括公寓号码)Street name and number(including number of apart-

 

 

 

住址

 

 

ment.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Address in

 

 

 

 

公寓 Apartment

街道 Street

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

China

 

 

 

 

县/市 County/City

 

省 Province

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

在中国境内通讯地址(如非上述住

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

邮编

 

 

 

 

电话

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

址)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

职业

 

 

 

 

 

 

服务单

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

服务地点

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Profession

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

中国境内所得已纳税额 Amount of income tax paid

境外所得应纳税额 Tax on income from sources

 

 

in China

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

outside China

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

所得项目

 

所得

应纳税

 

已纳所

 

自缴或扣

所得项目

收入额

减费用额

应纳税

速算扣

应纳

境外已

 

 

Categories

 

期间

所得额

 

得税额

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

所得额

 

除数

所得

缴税额

 

 

of income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

self-report-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

税额

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 102    (DE)

 

 

 

Vorteile von allgemeinen Geschäftsbedingungen (AGB)

 

auf Grundlage der United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG)

 

 

 

 

Januar 2015

 

 

All rights reserved © Lorenz & Partners 2015

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners (Hong Kong) Ltd. größtmögliche Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesem Newsletter bereitgestellten Informationen stets auf aktuellem Stand zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinwei-sen, dass dies eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen kann. Lorenz & Partners Ltd. übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität und Vollständigkeit der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Part-ners Ltd., welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verur-sacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners (Hong Kong) Ltd. kein vorsätzli-ches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

 

  1. Einführung

Rechtswahlklauseln in internationalen Ver-trägen haben in der Vergangenheit dazu ge-neigt, die Geltung des UN-Kaufrechts (United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods, kurz CISG) abzubedingen. Zunehmend aber be-dienen sich große Handelsgesellschaften – selbst in den USA – des vom CISG bereitge-stellten Rechtsrahmens. Das wachsende Ver-trauen in die Praxistauglichkeit des Einheits-rechts spiegelt sich nicht zuletzt in der Rati-fizierung der Konvention durch Japan am 1. August 2009 wider – dem wichtigsten Glo-bal Player, der sich zuvor dem Anschluss an die Konvention verweigert hatte. Es ist je-doch zuzugeben, dass neben Indien auch Großbritannien, Hongkong, Südafrika und Thailand die Konvention bislang noch nicht ratifiziert haben. Ein Beitritt dieser Staaten ist bisher auch nicht in Sicht. Mit diesem Newsletter wollen wir Ihnen einen kurzen Überblick über die Vorteile des CISG ver-schaffen und einige Vorschläge zur Einbe-ziehung dieses Regelwerks in Allgemeinen Geschäftsbedingungen (AGB) machen.

 

  1. Vorteile des UN-Kaufrechts

Die Regelungen des UN-Kaufrechts stellen weltweit anerkannte Standards für den inter-nationalen Handelskauf dar. Sie sind unter Berücksichtigung allgemeingültiger Han-delsbräuche speziell für Transaktionen im internationalen Geschäftsverkehr entworfen worden und werden als ein gerechter Aus-gleich zwischen den Interessen der Parteien empfunden. Bereits auf geschätzte 80% aller

 

 

abgeschlossenen internationalen Geschäfte ist das CISG anwendbar.

 

  • Anwenderfreundlichkeit

 

Die einzelnen Regelungen sind im Allgemei-nen nicht nur für Juristen, sondern auch für Geschäftsleute verständlich. Das fördert die Akzeptanz dieser Regelungen innerhalb der eigentlichen Zielgruppe, nämlich dem Nut-zer. Die einheitliche Terminologie begüns-tigt zudem die identische Auslegung vor den Gerichten verschiedener Staaten.

 

Inzwischen hat sich nicht nur eine ausgereif-te Dogmatik zum UN-Kaufrecht entwickelt, sondern auch eine umfangreiche Recht-sprechung, die vielfach auch im Internet oder anderen leicht zugänglichen Informati-onsquellen zur Verfügung steht. Bei der Auslegung der Konvention greifen die nati-onalen Gerichte regelmäßig auch auf die Ur-teile anderer Staaten zurück, weshalb das UN-Kaufrecht inzwischen als ein ausge-sprochen hochentwickeltes Rechtsgebiet gilt, das ein hohes Maß an Rechtssicherheit und eben auch an Gerechtigkeit gewährleistet.

 

Die Konvention ist von 83 Staaten, darunter allen Wirtschaftsmächten mit der Ausnahme Großbritanniens, Hongkongs und Indiens ratifiziert worden. Die Regelungen gelten unmittelbar. Das bedeutet, dass sie in die je-weiligen Rechtsordnungen inkorporiert worden sind. Dadurch lässt sich auch der oftmals hohe Zeit- und Kostenaufwand vermeiden, der häufig mit der Aushandlung des anwendbaren Rechts verbunden ist.

 

  • Internationale Einheitlichkeit

 

Allgemeine Geschäftsbedingungen auf der Grundlage des CISG eignen sich daher be-sonders, die Probleme, die sich im internati-onalen Handelsverkehr aufgrund unter-schiedlicher Rechtsordnungen ergeben, aus-zuräumen. Vielfach haben wir in unserer täglichen Arbeit erlebt, dass sich die Verein-barung des „heimischen Rechts“ in Allge-meinen Geschäftsbedingungen als kurzsich-tig erweisen kann. Vielfach ist mangels Voll-streckungsabkommens nur eine Klage vor dem Gericht des Handelspartners geeignet, einen rechtswirksamen Titel zu erlangen. Wenn sich jedoch ein Gericht mit einem ihm fremden Rechtssystem beschäftigen muss, bedeutet dies nicht nur hohe Kosten für Übersetzungen und Gutachter, sondern birgt die Gefahr, dass die entscheidenden Richter die Zusammenhänge nicht richtig er-fassen und zu einem fehlerhaften Urteil kommen. Diese Gefahr droht ebenso bei Schiedsgerichtsverfahren, da auch die Schiedsrichter in unterschiedlichen Rechts-ordnungen beheimatet sind. Wenn aber die entscheidenden Stellen auf Urteile aus der ganzen Welt zugreifen können, dann ist dies der korrekten Rechtsfindung förderlich und damit erheblich ergebnisorientierter.

 

Demnach können derartige Probleme durch eine intelligente Ausgestaltung der Allgemei-nen Geschäftsbedingungen auf der Grund-lage des CISG ausgeräumt werden, da es sich um ein einheitliches Regelwerk handelt, dass in allen Mitgliedsländern gleichermaßen in lokales Recht umgesetzt worden ist und zwischenzeitlich in weitem Masse Rechts-quellen zur Verfügung stehen, die eine ein-heitliche Auslegung gewährleisten sollen.

 

  • Vereinfachung der Anwendung

 

Ein weiterer Vorteil der Geltung des UN-Kaufrechts besteht darin, dass die Beurtei-lung der Frage, ob AGB Vertragsinhalt ge-worden sind (Einbeziehungskontrolle), ver-einheitlicht und vereinfacht wird. Zwar trifft es zu, dass das UN-Kaufrecht für die Einbe-

 

 

ziehung von AGB strengere Maßstäbe anlegt als das deutsche nicht-vereinheitlichte Recht (d.h. ohne die Geltung des UN-Kaufrechts). So reicht es regelmäßig nicht aus, dass ledig-lich auf die Geltung von AGB verwiesen wird, die dann beispielsweise auf der Inter-netseite abrufbar sind. Stattdessen müssen die AGB vielmehr im Einzelfall zur Verfü-gung gestellt und ihre Geltung explizit ver-einbart werden. Dieser Umstand spricht in-des nicht gegen die Vereinbarung des UN-Kaufrechts. Zunächst einmal führt die weit-gehende Aufgabe der Differenzierung zwi-schen individuell vereinbartem Vertragstext und AGB zu einer einfacheren Rechtsan-wendung. Gleichzeitig verhindert die Einbe-ziehungskontrolle gemäß UN-Kaufrecht, dass nationale Hürden für die Einbeziehung zum Tragen kommen, die mitunter noch höhere Anforderungen stellen. All dies trägt zur Rechtssicherheit bei. Im Übrigen findet bei der subsidiären Geltung des deutschen nicht-vereinheitlichen Rechts im Anwen-dungsbereich des UN-Kaufrechts dessen strengere Einbeziehungskontrolle auch dann statt, wenn die Geltung des UN-Kaufrechts per AGB ausgeschlossen wird.

 

In Einzelfällen ermöglicht das UN-Kaufrecht auch eine flexiblere Handhabung von Regelungsgegenständen wie etwa der Haftungsbegrenzung bei Vereinbarung einer Garantie. Nach deutschem Recht besteht hier aufgrund von § 444 BGB beispielsweise fast kein Handlungsspielraum.

 

III. Empfehlung

Bei allen Vorzügen der Vereinbarung des UN-Kaufrechts ist genau darauf Acht zu ge-ben, dass die Regelungen auf die Bedürfnisse des jeweiligen Unternehmens abgestimmt sind. Dazu empfehlen wir Ihnen grundsätz-lich, separate AGB zum einen für den Ein-kauf und zum anderen für den Verkauf aus-zuarbeiten. Da die Regelungen des UN-Kaufrechts abdingbar sind, ist im Detail ab-zuwägen, in welchen Punkten von den Be-stimmungen des UN-Kaufrechts abgewichen werden sollte. Des Weiteren stellt das UN-Kaufrecht kein geschlossenes Rege-lungswerk dar, sondern bedarf der Lücken-ausfüllung. Dies kann durch die Gestaltung von AGB erfolgen.

 

Wichtig ist insbesondere, dass die Anwen-dungskaskade eindeutig verstanden und be-schrieben wird (Individualabreden, Ausle-gung des Vertrags, AGB, CISG, das verein-barte nationale Recht und sodann das nach dem internationalen Privatrecht zu bestim-mende anwendbare nationale Recht und zu-letzt die Entscheidung des Richters nach bestem Wissen und Gewissen).

 

  1. Fazit

Folglich ist als Fazit festzuhalten, dass die Anwendung des CISG fast ausschließlich mit Vorteilen einhergeht.

 

 

Insbesondere für global aktive Unternehmen sind die Regeln des CISG zum größten Teil mit Vorteilen behaftet. So kann in allen Streitigkeiten, unabhängig vom Staat in dem man aktiv wird, davon ausgegangen werden, dass die Entscheidung des Gerichts im We-sentlichen gleich ausfallen wird. Dies wäre bei Vereinbarung von einem nationalen Recht weltweit unserer Erfahrung nach nicht der Fall. Zudem müsste eine Anpassung an die jeweiligen nationalen Rechte vorgenom-men werden, die nicht immer mit dem ge-wünschten nationalen Recht kompatibel sind. Das aber führt zu höheren Kosten und einem deutlich erhöhten Verwaltungsauf-wand, welcher eingespart werden kann wenn das CISG weltweit angewendet wird und so-genannte Welt-AGB geschaffen werden. Nur in diesem Fall ist eine einheitliche und verhältnismäßig einfache Handhabung der Situation möglich.

 

 

Newsletter No. 102      (EN)

 

 

Advantages of applying the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG) in General Terms and Conditions

 

 

 

January 2015

 

  

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newslet-ters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the in-formation provided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a per-sonal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incor-rect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

  1. Introduction

 

There are still practitioners advising their clients to exclude the applicability of the United Nations Convention on Con-tracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG) in contracts and general terms and conditions.

 

However, more and more experts – in-cluding those in the U.S. – avail them-selves of the legal framework that the CISG provides. This newsletter summa-rises the main advantages of CISG and will address issues that must be kept in mind when drafting general terms and conditions under the regime of the CISG.

 

  1. Benefits of the CISG as the law governing contracts

 

  • CISG ratified by almost all major trade nations

 

More than 95% of the world trade is be-ing carried out between nations that have acceded the CISG. As of Septem-ber 2014, 83 nations have ratified the CISG, among them all major economic powers (with the exception of Great Britain and Hong Kong). The increasing confidence in the efficiency of the CISG is underpinned by the accession of Japan effective 1 August 2009 – the biggest global player which hitherto abstained from signing the Convention.

 

  • CISG is “local law”

 

The rules of the CISG are directly en-forceable, as they have been incorpo-

 

rated into the local law of the contract-ing member states. Therefore, without having been agreed upon by parties of CISG member-states, the CISG will be the applicable law governing cross bor-der trade between contracting states as the law which both parties have in common. This does not only generate trust and confidence between the parties to the contract, but also helps to avoid a considerable amount of time and money arising often from lengthy negotiations about the applicable law.

 

  • CISG as role model for the local law of obligations

 

The rules of the unified sales law com-prise world-wide acclaimed standards for international sales transactions. They were specifically devised for interna-tional commercial trade, taking into ac-count the universal customs and prac-tices of the member states. This is why the rules are generally regarded as strik-ing a fair balance between the interests of the parties. The world-wide recogni-tion of the rules is further reflected by their impact on the legislation of nation states as well as on international unifica-tion attempts such as the Principles of International Commercial Contracts (PICC) or the Principles of European Contract Law (PECL). The CISG has served as model for the reform of law of obligations in countries stretching from Estonia to China, most notably the re-form of the law of obligations in Ge-many of 2002. Thus, over the past three decades since the CISG has come into existence, it has established itself as a

lingua  franca“ not only for the sale of goods law, but also for the entire law of obligation.

 

  • CISG is clear and transparent

 

The individual rules are easily accessible not only for lawyers but also for busi-nessmen. In comparison to the German Civil Code for instance, the CISG has a much clearer and more transparent out-line. In particular, the system of reme-dies available to one party in case the other party is in default follows the same basic pattern for both the seller and the purchaser. Further, the Convention does not distinguish between various types of default, with some minor exceptions (e.g. Art. 50, 65 CISG).

 

  • CISG means consistent terminol-ogy across borders

 

The consistent terminology across the jurisdictions facilitates a consistent in-terpretation of the Convention by courts of different countries. Over the time it has not only evolved an impressive body of scholarly work but also an extensive set of case law, accessible via digital da-tabases and mostly translated into the English language. Chinese courts alone account for many hundreds of cases.

Although there is no precedent on an in-ternational level, national courts fre-quently revert to court judgments from other countries, and the CISG has as a consequence evolved into a matter of law which is highly sophisticated and predictable.

 

  • CISG allows flexibility

 

At the same time the CISG allows a flexible application where needed, hav-ing regard to the pertaining trade prac-tice and all circumstances involved. It must be conceded that both uniformity and predictability of law are to some ex-tent impaired by the use of such terms as “reasonable time” in respect to peri-ods or “fundamental breach” as a pre-

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

requisite for the rescission of a contract. On the other side, a world-wide unifica-tion of law through a set of rigid rules and time periods would inevitably have to disregard national, regional or local customs, which deserve due considera-tion when issuing a judgment.

 

  • CISG and General Terms and Conditions

 

Another advantage of the applicability of the CISG is that its regime also de-termines whether general terms and conditions were successfully included into the contract, thus the user of gen-eral terms and conditions will not have to consider this question from the per-spective of the respective law of each place he conducts business in. It is true that in order for general terms and con-ditions to be included, the CISG im-poses stricter criteria than some national laws, e.g. German civil law. It is not suf-ficient to merely refer to general terms and conditions which can be downloaded on the user’s website. In-stead, the general terms and conditions must on a case-by-case basis be pro-vided to the other party which then has to explicitly agree to their inclusion.

 

However, this fact must not be seen as a deterrent from agreeing upon CISG. First of all, as the CISG does not distin-guish between the individual contract and general terms and conditions, it fa-cilitates the handling of legal issues re-garding the formation of a contract. At the same time, the applicability of the CISG prevents the other party from in-voking national laws that might set still higher standards for the inclusion of general terms and conditions. All of the above enhance the certainty of law. Apart from that, when German Interna-tional Private Law is applicable, the stricter rules of CISG will govern the question of whether the general terms and conditions were included into the contract even if the applicability of the CISG has been explicitly excluded in those general terms and conditions.

 

In some cases the CISG even allows a more flexible handling of legal matters than the national laws. For example, while the CISG allows the limitation of liability when a guarantee has been given, § 444 of the German Civil Code does not permit any alterations.

 

III. Guidance

 

Despite all virtues of the CISG as the law governing the contract, one has to ensure that the rules are specifically tai-lored to your company’s needs by ad-justing the general terms and conditions accordingly. We generally suggest that separate general terms and conditions should be used for purchase contracts on the one hand and sales contracts on the other hand. As the rules of the CISG are not compulsory, it should be very carefully considered in which respects the suggestions of the CISG are to be amended. There are also some pitfalls to which special attention needs to be paid to as shown in the following example:

 

Article 43 CISG

 

  1. The buyer loses the right to rely on the pro-visions of article 41 or article 42 if he does not give notice to the seller specifying the nature of the right or claim of the third party within a reasonable time after he has become aware or ought to have become aware of the right or claim.

 

  1. The seller is not entitled to rely on the provi-sions of the preceding paragraph if he knew of the right or claim of the third party and the na-ture of it.

 

Pursuant to the CISG the purchaser might by way of negligence lose his rights arising from a defect in title. In order to eliminate this incalculable risk we therefore suggest this provision to be excluded in general terms and condi-tions for purchase. The seller on the other hand has an interest to specify the time frame within which the purchaser shall inform the seller of any defects that come to the attention of the purchaser.

Purchaser:

Article 43 of the United Nations Conven-tion on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods is excluded. Seller shall be liable for defects in title regardless of whether Pur-chaser gives Seller notice specifying the nature of the right or claim of a third party.

Seller:

 

Purchaser shall lose the right to rely on a breach of Articles 41 and 42 if it does not give notice to Seller specifying the nature of the right or claim of the third party no later than … [time period] … from the date when Purchaser became aware or ought to have be-come aware of the right or claim.

Furthermore, the CISG does not consti-tute a comprehensive body of law but needs to be complemented. This can also largely be covered by general terms and conditions. In particular, it is important to clearly lay down the order of precedence between the individual contract, general terms and conditions, CISG, conflict of laws, and national law.

 

 

Newsletter No. 107 (EN)

 

 

 

Protection of Trade Secrets in China

 

 

 

 

February 2015

 

 

 Although Lorenz & Partners always pays greatest attention on updating the information provided in this news-letter we cannot take responsibility for the topicality, completeness or quality of the information provided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

  1. Introduction

 

With the economic boom of Mainland China and the continuously growing volume of foreign direct investment, the question of how to protect trade secrets and pursue the liabilities of the infringers has become in-creasingly serious for foreign enterprises and foreign invested enterprises. This especially includes those successfully doing business since their entry into the Chinese market. Those yet to enter the market will certainly benefit from understanding this issue and es-tablishing sound mechanisms to tackle this problem. This Newsletter is an attempt to discuss some critical legal aspects of trade secret protection by analysing a representa-tive case which has been included into the case database of the PRC People’s Supreme Court.

 

  1. Facts of the Case

 

YSJ Co., Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as “YSJ”) is a Chinese company engaged in providing enterprise consultancy services in the field of finance and management. Zhao was one of the founders as well as a director of YSJ. The company relies on its internal Management System (in this case called a DN 88 Management System) to manage and maintain a large amount of confidential cli-ent data and other business information, the access to which is restricted and requires au-thorisation within the company. As one of the senior management personnel, Zhao had been granted unlimited access to the internal DN 88 Management System.

 

Later on, Zhao chose to leave the company stating emigration as reason. However, in fact, Zhao never emigrated from China after leaving YSJ. Instead, he set up JSB Co., Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as “JSB”) carrying on

 

business which is completely identical to that of YSJ.

 

While competing with YSJ, Zhao and JSB presented the clients of YSJ to be those of their own and exaggerated the reputation and quality of services of JSB, based on which and slightly lower service prices, JSB managed to poach customers from YSJ. In order to protect its interest, YSJ sued Zhao and JSB at the Shanghai No. 1 Intermediary Court for infringement of trade secrets.

 

  1. What qualifies a client list as trade se-cret?

 

During the proceedings, the intense debate between the plaintiff and the defendants was based on the question whether the customer list constituted a trade secret of YSJ.

 

A trade secret is defined by the PRC Anti-Unfair Competition Law (effective as of 2 December 1993) to have the following three features:

 

  • It is not known to the public;

 

  • It is practically useful and may bring business profit to its owner;

 

  • Its owner has taken appropriate measures to keep it confidential.

 

Business information shall simultaneously meet the aforesaid three conditions to be qualified as trade secret.

 

In the present case, since JSB was engaged in virtually identical business activities as those of YSJ, the court thus recognized that the relevant client information may generate business profit. During the court hearing, YSJ submitted invoices, payment receipts and relevant client information to prove that seven clients, who had been listed on the

 

 

website of JSB as its clients, in fact were originally the clients of YSJ.

 

Furthermore, YSJ proved that it had taken a series of necessary measures including re-stricting authorization of access to the Man-agement System, establishing internal confi-dentiality rules, incorporating confidentiality obligations into the labour contract with Zhao etc. to secure the confidentiality of the client information. Based on this evidence, the court concluded that YSJ had taken ap-propriate measures to protect its client in-formation.

 

The defence side argued as its primary ob-jection the fact that the related client infor-mation had also been publicised on the web-site of YSJ whereby it had become known to the public and thus was no longer confiden-tial. The court eventually overruled the ob-jection on the following ground:

 

Despite the fact that the related client names have been publicized on the website of YSJ, such names are merely abbreviations and did not reveal any core information such as con-tact methods, terms and conditions, transac-tion habits and intentions. Consequently, it cannot be proven that the related client in-formation was already known to the public before being used by JSB.

 

This was a case in which a court in Shanghai clearly recognized and supported the protec-tion of client information as a trade secret. It can be practically concluded that client in-formation which qualifies as trade secret cannot be a simple client list and must be specific and differentiated to such an extent that they cannot be easily acquired or ac-cessed by the public. It was precisely because the client information in the present case fulfils this condition that it eventually quali-fied as trade secret.

 

 

  1. Establishment of trade secret in-fringement and onus probandi

 

In judicial practice, the rule of “access and similarity” broadly applies in determining the onus probandi in trade secret infringement cases. According to this principle, given that certain information qualifies as a trade se-cret, if there is evidence proving that the al-leged infringer was ever granted access to such information and the alleged infringer has disclosed or used information which is materially similar to the trade secret, the court will usually conclude there is an in-fringement, unless the alleged infringer can prove that he has obtained such information from a legal source.

 

Two important principles underlie the rule of “access and similarity”: Firstly, the plain-tiff only needs to assume the onus probandi gradually and accordingly; he is not required to completely disclose the trade secret and may gradually disclose the relevant parts of the concerned trade secret in response to the arguments of the defendant. Secondly, the onus probandi will shift to the defendant to prove the contrary under certain circum-stances such as in cases of poached employ-ees or manufacturing identical products. These principles were also applied by the court in the present case.

 

Therefore, YSJ was able to focus on evi-dence which could prove “access and simi-larity”. YSJ provided the court with the login interface of Zhao and the operational instruction of the subsequent interfaces after login, which proved that the access to the Management System was restricted and en-tailed authorization and as a partner Zhao was granted such access. This fact was rein-forced by the evidence where Zhao ap-proved internal employment and work data in his capacity as partner of the company. Furthermore, these pieces of evidence proved that important client information could be accessed via this system.

 

YSJ demonstrated that they used to provide finance consultancy services to a number of multinational companies since 2005. Other evidence proved that the same companies were listed on the website of JSB as custom-ers of JSB. They had even been included into the service proposals made by JSB to its potential customers. The business relation-ship between JSB and the concerned cus-tomers of YSJ was thus established by the court.

 

Based on the above, the court found that Zhao was able to access the trade secret of YSJ and the business of JSB established by Zhao was materially similar to that of YSJ. It was eventually stated in the court verdict that the two defendants had been found li-able for infringing the trade secret of YSJ and were ordered to jointly cease any in-fringement and compensate YSJ for its cor-responding economic loss.

 

 

  1. Conclusion

 

While establishing a sound mechanism to protect their trade secrets, it is imperative for companies to take into account the fea-tures of trade secrets and the main principles and rules a court usually applies in infringe-ment cases.

 

Similar to any type of civil proceedings, trade secret infringement cases can only be won with strong factual evidence and per-suasive legal arguments. It is nevertheless more difficult to collect evidence and even organize a cohesive and well-built evidence chain in trade secret infringement cases than in most of other civil infringements cases.

 

Moreover, and with regard to compensation, due to the highly variable profitability of dif-ferent industries and the lack of consistent practice, Chinese courts appear to be rela-tively more flexible and unpredictable in de-termining the amount of compensation they will grant and appear more susceptible to the quality of the evidence and arguments of both sides.

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 108    (DE)

 

 

 

 

 

Zollfreier Handel innerhalb von ASEAN und den Nachbarländern

 

Januar 2015

 

 Obwohl Lorenz & Partners große Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesen Newslettern bereitgestellten Infor-mationen auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass diese ei-ne individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen können. Lorenz & Partners übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktuali-tät, Korrektheit oder Vollständigkeit der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners, welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnut-zung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

In diesem Newsletter untersuchen wir unter welchen Voraussetzungen Produkte, die in einem Lande der Association of Southeast Asian Nations („ASEAN“) hergestellt wer-den, in einem anderen ASEAN Staat zollfrei vertrieben werden können.

 

  1. Einführung

 

Die ASEAN hat 10 Mitgliedsstaaten (Indo-nesien, Malaysia, die Philippinen, Singapur, Thailand, Brunei, Myanmar, Kambodscha, Laos und Vietnam). Jeder dieser Staaten ist multilateral und bilateral mit verschiedenen anderen Staaten verbunden.

 

Bereits 1992 hatte die ASEAN die Etablie-rung einer ASEAN-Freihandelszone, der AFTA (Asean Free Trade Area), beschlossen. Für die Gründungsmitglieder, die “ASEAN-6” (Brunei, Indonesien, Singapur, Thailand, Malaysia, Philippinen), sind die AFTA-Bestimmungen seit Januar 2010 in Kraft, die 99 Prozent der Zölle auf 0 bis 5 Prozent re-duziert haben. Für die übrigen ASEAN-Länder Vietnam, Laos, Kambodscha und Myanmar gilt eine Übergangsphase bis 2015. Das AFTA ebnet den weiteren Weg für den anvisierten ASEAN-Binnenmarkt (“Asean Economic Community” oder „AEC“)). Die-ser soll bis 2015 zu einem gemeinsamen Markt und Produktionsstandort für Güter, Dienstleistungen, Kapital und Arbeit avancie-ren. Der Anteil der ASEAN am Welthandel wird häufig unterschätzt. ASEAN liegt mit einem Anteil von knapp 6 Prozent am Welt-handel nur leicht hinter dem Chinas, der rund 10 Prozent des Welthandels bestreitet – und vor Indien mit einem Anteil von knapp 2 Prozent. Insgesamt bietet die ASEAN-Region einen Wirtschaftsraum mit mehr als 590 Millionen Menschen und einem Brutto-inlandsprodukt von 1,5 Billionen US-Dollar.

 

Die ursprünglichen sechs ASEAN-Länder, namentlich Brunei, Indonesien, Malaysia, die Philippinen, Singapur und Thailand, konnten

 

bereits bei mehr als 99% der gehandelten Produkte der CEPT Inclusion List (IL) of ASEAN-6 die Zölle auf ein Niveau von 0-5% senken. Die neueren Mitgliedstaaten, Kam-bodscha, Laos, Myanmar und Vietnam, sind in Bezug auf das Senken der Zölle dicht da-hinter.

 

Zolltarife beziehen sich auf verschiedene HS-Nummern. Dies entspricht einem harmonisier-ten System von mehreren tausend Gütern, die alle eindeutig mit einer HS-Nummer be-zeichnet sind, wobei allerdings zwischen ver-schiedenen Staaten teilweise verschiedene Auffassungen bestehen. Zolltarife werden (vom Grundsatz her) im Laufe der Jahre ge-ringer (es sei denn, es gibt kurzfristige Anti-Dumping Maßnahmen, was bedeutet, dass die Zollsätze bei einigen Warengruppen zeit-weise erhöht werden (z.B. bei Stahl, Reis, Schuhen, etc.) oder dass durch fallbezogene Quoten die Einfuhr erschwert oder ver-hindert wird.

 

Beim Export von einem Land in ein anderes kommt als Zoll-Berechnungsgrundlage grundsätzlich in Betracht der Zollsatz

 

  • der ASEAN Mitgliedsstaaten untereinan-der,

 

  • eines Free Trade Agreements („FTA“), das die ASEAN-Staaten mit einem Dritt-land abgeschlossen haben (z.B. ASEAN Plus Three – China, Japan und Südkorea),

 

  • eines FTA, das ein einzelner ASEAN Staat mit einem Drittland abgeschlossen hat (z.B. Thailand mit Australien),

 

  • der Regularien der World Trade Organi-sation („WTO“) und
  • der Länder, die in keine dieser Kategorien fallen.

 

 

  1. Bilaterale und Multilaterale Abkom-men

 

  • ASEAN Mitgliedsstaaten untereinan-der

 

Der Zusammenschluss der ASEAN-Staaten fand am 8. August 1967 in Bangkok zwischen den ersten sechs Mitgliedsstaaten statt. Im Zeitalter des Kalten Krieges – als die Eskala-tion des Vietnam-Krieges seinem Höhepunkt entgegensteuerte – einigten sich die Staaten Brunei, Indonesien, Malaysia, die Philippinen, Singapur und Thailand auf eine enge Zu-sammenarbeit mit der Zielsetzung wirtschaft-lichen und sozialen Wachstums.

 

  • ASEAN Plus

 

Es wurde erkannt, dass diese Ziele nicht aus-schließlich durch die Zusammenarbeit der ge-nannten ASEAN Länder untereinander er-reicht werden können. Daher werden weitere bilaterale Verträge von ASEAN mit anderen Nationen angestrebt.

 

  1. aa) China

 

So ist die Zusammenarbeit von ASEAN mit China in bestimmten Teilen des Wirtschafts-lebens bereits vereinbart worden und trat im Juli 2005 in Kraft (das ASEAN China Free

 

Trade Agreement: „ACFTA“). Als Folge ist China seit 2009 ASEANs größter Handels-partner. Um die Partnerschaft ASEAN-China in Bezug auf Frieden und Wohlstand weiter zu vertiefen, wurde für den Zeitraum 2011-2015 im Oktober 2010 ein Aktionsplan auf den Weg gebracht. Dieser betrifft insbe-sondere die elf Bereiche Landwirtschaft, In-formations- und Kommunikationstechnolo-gien, die Entwicklung des Humankapitals, die Entwicklung des Mekong-Beckens, Investi-tionen, Energie, Transport, Kultur, öffentli-che Gesundheit, Tourismus und Umwelt. Das Ziel der Kriminalitätsbekämpfung wurde verstärkt durch einen weiteren Aktionsplan im Jahre 2011. Um die Kommunikation und Koordination in der ASEAN-China-Partnerschaft voranzutreiben, entsandte Chi-na erstmals im September 2012 einen dauer-haften Repräsentanten an die ASEAN.

 

  1. bb) Japan

 

Anlässlich eines ASEAN -Japan-Gipfeltref-fens im November 2011 beschlossen die

 

Vorsitzenden beider Seiten die Joint Declaration zur Förderung der strategischen ASEAN-Japan-Partnerschaft für gemein-schaftliches Wachstum und verabschiedeten einen ASEAN-Japan-Aktionsplan für den Zeitraum von 2011-2015. Insgesamt behält Japan seinen Status als zweitgrößter Han-delspartner der ASEAN-Zone nach China. Zeitgleich ist Japan zur zweitgrößten Quelle von Direktinvestitionen (FDI) in der ASEAN-Region geworden. Die Kommuni-kation zwischen ASEAN und Japan wird über integrierte Mechanismen wie Gipfel-, Experten- und Ministertreffen sowie regiona-le Foren und Unterorganisationen gesteuert. 2004 trat Japan dem Freundschafts- und Kooperationsvertrag (TAC) bei. Letztlich en-gagiert sich Japan auch im Bereich maritimer Sicherheit, was 2007 zur Einrichtung des ASEAN Maritim Forums (AMF) führte.

 

  1. cc) Südkorea

 

Das Verhältnis ASEAN-Südkorea erfuhr einen Höhenflug mit der Unterzeichnung ei-nes Kooperationsvertrags in 2004 und der Umsetzung eines Aktionsplanes in 2005. Im Jahre 2010 vertieften ASEAN und Südkorea die Partnerschaft, indem sie ihre Zusammen-arbeit, welche bisher von Dialog und Koope-ration geprägt war, zu einer strategischen Partnerschaft ausbauten. Begleitet wurde das Vorhaben wiederum von einer Joint Declaration verbunden mit einem Aktions-plan bezogen auf die Jahre 2011-2015. Im Zuge dessen und im Hinblick auf die Förde-rung der engen Zusammenarbeit und des ge-genseitigen Verständnisses ernannte und ent-sandte Südkorea erstmals im September 2012 einen ständigen Repräsentanten, welcher die Kooperation mit ASEAN koordiniert. Die ASEAN-Südkorea-Kooperation hat in den Bereichen Politik und Sicherheit durch Dia-log und Austausch sowohl auf regionaler als auch auf internationaler Ebene – im Rahmen von durch die Kooperations- bzw. Partner-schaftsvereinbarungen festgelegten Mecha-nismen, insbesondere durch Gipfeltreffen, Ministermeetings und den ASEAN Plus Three (APT)-Prozess – eine Stärkung erfah-ren.

 

 

  1. dd) Indien

Mit der Unterzeichnung des Freihandelsrah-menvertrages zwischen den ASEAN-Staaten und Indien trat zum 1. Januar 2010 die Frei-handelszone ASEAN–India Free Trade Area (AIFTA) in Kraft. Hierdurch wurde ei-ne der größten Freihandelszonen der Welt mit einem Markt von 1,8 Billionen Menschen und einem Bruttoinlandsprodukt von 2,8 Billionen US$ geschaffen. Von dem Freihan-delsabkommen ausgenommen wurden zum Beispiel Produkte aus den Bereichen Agrar-produktion, Kfz-Teile, Textilien, Plastik und Chemikalien. Bei anderen Produkten bat sich Indien übergangsweise einen längeren Zeit-raum für die Umsetzung der Zollsenkungen aus. Hierunter fallen Palmöl, Kaffee, Tee und Pfeffer, auf die der Zoll bis 2019 auf 40 bis 45% gesenkt werden soll. Parallel hierzu schlossen die ASEAN-Staaten und Indien 2009 eine Schiedsgerichtsvereinbarung.

 

  1. ee) Australien und Neuseeland

Seit 2009 besteht ein Abkommen mit Austra-lien und Neuseeland („AANZFTA“). Die

Besonderheit bei AANZFTA ist, dass das Abkommen – entgegen der Absprache – am 1. Januar 2010 nur für die Länder Australien, Neuseeland, Brunei, Myanmar, Malaysia, die Philippinen, Singapur, Thailand und Vietnam in Kraft getreten ist, da man sich mit den an-deren Mitgliedsstaaten nicht auf einverständ-liche Grundlagen einigen konnte, wobei im Falle Thailands ohnehin bereits ein FTA in Kraft war. Das Abkommen AANZFTA trat am 1 Januar 2011 für Laos, am 4. Januar 2011 für Kambodscha und am 10. Januar 2012 für Indonesien in Kraft.

 

  1. ff) Europäische Union und Deutschland

 

Zurzeit werden weitere Verhandlungen von der ASEAN mit Ländern wie Kanada, der Ukraine, Pakistan und der Europäischen Union geführt. Deutschland hat aufgrund der Zugehörigkeit zur Europäischen Union keinerlei Möglichkeit, einen bilateralen Ver-trag mit ASEAN zu schließen. Diese Auf-gabe erfüllt die Europäische Union gemäß dem Unionsvertrag nun im Ganzen mit Bin-dungswirkung für alle Mitgliedstaaten. Im Mai 2010 beschlossen die ASEAN-Staaten und die EU als Weiterentwicklung zum Part-nerschaftsvertrag von 2007 den Aktionsplan

 

BANDAR  SERI  BEGAWAN  PLAN   OF

ACTION     TO     STRENGTHEN     THE

 

ASEAN-EU ENHANCED PARTNER-SHIP für dem Zeitraum 2013-2017 zur För-derung der Zusammenarbeit zwischen ASEAN und der EU.

 

ASEAN und die EU vereinbarten, dass alle zwei Jahre Ministertreffen stattfinden sollen. Die Zusammenarbeit erstreckt sich neben der wirtschaftlichen Kooperation auf unter-schiedliche Gebiete wie beispielsweise den Kampf gegen Terrorismus und Piraterie. Im Mai 2011 setzen die Wirtschaftsminister das ASEAN-EU-Handels- und Investitions-programm um. Dieses umfasst unter ande-rem eine vertiefte Zusammenarbeit in den Bereichen Urheberrecht, Reduzierung techni-scher Handelsbarrieren sowie die Entwick-lung von Handelsbräuchen im Durchgangs-handel.

 

Auch für Deutschland ist ein Engagement in der ASEAN-Zone interessant, da die deut-sche Wirtschaft gerade mit grünen Zukunfts-technologien in der ASEAN-Region punkten kann. Denn angesichts der Wirtschaftsdy-namik besteht ein enormer Bedarf an um-weltfreundlichen, energieeffizienten Lösun-gen für ein nachhaltiges Wachstum. Aller-dings trifft die deutsche Wirtschaft auch auf zunehmend stärkeren Wettbewerb in Asien. Künftig wird es daher mehr denn je darauf ankommen, Kooperationen und Partner-schaften – insbesondere bei Technologie, In-novationen sowie Forschung und Entwick-lung zu etablieren.

 

  1. gg) Schweiz

 

Fast 22 % aller Exporte der Schweiz gehen nach Asien. Interessant für die Schweiz ist vor allem das Wachstum der Mittelschicht und dem damit einhergehenden Wachstum des Konsums der Mittelklasse, da Schweizer Unternehmen mit qualitativ hochstehenden Produkten eher im Hochpreissegment aktiv sind. Neben Vietnam und Singapur gehört Thailand zu den engsten Handelspartnern der Schweiz in Asien. Bisher besteht aller-dings lediglich zwischen der Schweiz und Singapur ein Freihandelsabkommen. Ver-handlungen zwischen der European Free Trade Association („EFTA“), deren wichtigs-tes Mitglied die Schweiz ist, und Thailand sind, nachdem diese 2006 ins Stocken gerie-ten, wieder aufgenommen worden.

 

Nachdem im Dezember 2008 die ASEAN-Charta in Kraft getreten ist, welche den Rahmen für eine engere wirtschaftliche In-tegration bildet und die Akkreditierung von Botschaftern aus Nichtmitgliedstaaten er-möglicht, entsandte die Schweiz 2009 einen Botschafter zur ASEAN-Staatengemein-schaft.

 

  • Free Trade Agreement eines Mit-gliedsstaates mit Drittstaaten

Ferner ist es möglich, dass jeder ASEAN-Mitgliedsstaat selbst und unabhängig von ASEAN ein Freihandelsabkommen mit ei-nem Drittstaat schließt. Thailand bei-spielsweise hat im Jahr 2003 ein FTA mit Australien geschlossen, das seit dem 1. Januar 2005 in Kraft ist („TAFTA“). Ebenso beste-hen derartige Abkommen mit China (2003) und Indien (2004), die teilweise über die ASEAN Vereinbarungen hinausgehen.

 

  • WTO

Alle Mitgliedsstaaten der ASEAN sind Mit-glieder der WTO. Laos seit Februar 2013, Thailand, die Philippinen, Singapur, Indonesein, Malaysia, Brunei und Burma seit 1995, Kambodscha seit 2004 und Vietnam seit 2007.

 

Im Rahmen dieses Artikels ist es nicht mög-lich, alle multilateralen Abkommen der ASEAN Staaten mit anderen Drittstaaten zu beleuchten und deren jeweilige Ausnahmen aufzulisten. Sollten über diesen Artikel hinaus aber weitergehende Fragen bestehen, spre-chen Sie uns bitte an. Es ist schwierig, für eine bestimmte Warengruppe (HS-Nummer) in einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt das günstigs-te einschlägige Abkommen zu finden. Der Unterschied bei der Verzollung kann indes sehr hoch sein.

 

  1. Export-/Importvoraussetzungen

 

Für den Import und Export von Produkten aus ASEAN Ländern in andere Vertragsstaa-ten und Drittstaaten wird grundsätzlich ein Ursprungszeugnis für das Produkt benötigt. Es gibt zwei Arten:

 

  • Reguläres Ursprungszeugnis,

 

  • Qualifiziertes Ursprungszeugnis.

 

  1. a) Reguläres Ursprungszeugnis

Das reguläre Ursprungszeugnis benennt le-diglich das Herkunftsland. Hierfür gibt es üb-licherweise keinerlei Zollvergünstigungen beim Import.

 

Mögliche Aussteller dieser Art von Ur-sprungszeugnissen sind in Thailand zum Bei-spiel: The Thai Chamber of Commerce, The De-partment of Foreign Trade und The Federation of Thai Industries. Insbesondere dieThai Chamber of Commerce erstellt Ursprungszeugnisse, so-fern das exportierte Gut in Thailand fertig gestellt wurde. Hierzu reicht schon die Mon-tage einzelner Teilprodukte zu einem End-produkt in Thailand.

 

Allerdings verlangen verschiedene Import-länder über das reguläre Ursprungszeugnis hinaus weitere Formalitäten. Insbesondere Exporte in den Nahen Osten müssen sehr genau vorbereitet werden, da hier zum Bei-spiel das Herkunftsland auf dem Produkt selbst und nicht lediglich auf der Verpackung erwähnt sein muss.

 

  1. b) Qualifiziertes Ursprungszeugnis

Mit einem qualifizierten Ursprungszeugnis gilt das Endprodukt als in dem jeweils aus-stellenden Land hergestellt und genießt damit besondere zollrechtliche Behandlungen, ge-gebenenfalls bis hin zur Zollbefreiung. Ein qualifiziertes Ursprungszeugnis muss bei der jeweils zuständigen Stelle beantragt werden und kann nur dann ausgestellt werden, wenn bestimmte Voraussetzungen erfüllt sind. Grundsätzlich muss das Endprodukt eine substantielle Änderung (Mehrwert) im Ver-gleich zu den Ausgangsprodukten erfahren haben. Als Kriterien sind anerkannt:

 

  • das Verarbeitungskriterium oder

 

  • das Anteilskriterium.

 

Die Auswahl, auf welches dieser Kriterien zurückgegriffen werden kann, ist abhängig davon, in welches Land exportiert werden soll.

 

  1. aa) Das Verarbeitungskriterium

 

Nach dem Verarbeitungskriterium müssen mindestens 40 % des FOB-Exportwertes in dem Land als Mehrwert generiert werden, umals in diesem Land hergestellt zu gelten (z.B.: Import von Rohmaterial aus Deutschland nach Thailand für 100, Mehrwert hinzugefügt durch Weiterverarbeitung und lokale Materia-lien in Höhe von 80, Verkauf inklusive Ge-winn zum Preis von 190. Danach wurde in Thailand an dem Produkt ein Mehrwert von etwa 42% geschaffen, was somit dazu führt, dass es innerhalb von ASEAN oder auch ASEAN Plus zollfrei exportiert werden kann). Diese erwähnten 40% des Exportwer-tes müssen aus dem exportierenden Land oder einem anderen ASEAN-Mitgliedsstaat stammen oder als von dort stammend gelten (und damit selbst ein entsprechendes qualifi-ziertes Ursprungszeugnis haben).

 

  1. bb) Das Anteilskriterium

 

Ferner gibt es das sogenannte Anteilskriteri-um, wonach die Herkunft der Aus-gangsprodukte grundsätzlich nicht relevant ist. Der anteilige Wert der Verarbeitung darf aber einen bestimmten Prozentsatz nicht un-terschreiten. (Beispiel: Einfuhr von Gold im Wert von 100, Verarbeitung des Goldes zu Schmuck und Export zum Preis von 150. Hier ist ein Wertzuwachs von 50% generiert worden, der dazu führt, dass das Produkt ein qualifiziertes Ursprungszeugnis erhält.)

 

  1. Zollfreier Verkauf

Beim Export innerhalb ASEAN oder in ein Drittland ist es wichtig, die entsprechenden Abkommen zu kennen und anwenden zu können. Jedes Abkommen ermöglicht eine andere Art der Behandlung der Produkte beim Import in das jeweilige Land.

 

  1. a) ASEAN

Innerhalb der ASEAN Mitgliedsstaaten ist der Handel grundsätzlich zollfrei möglich, so-weit das Produkt ein qualifiziertes Ur-sprungszeugnis hat. Nur die Staaten Kam-bodscha, Laos, Myanmar und Vietnam haben noch bis zum Jahr 2015 Zeit, den momentan bestehenden Einfuhrzoll zu reduzieren. Die Zölle betragen hier zurzeit zwischen 0% für die meisten landwirtschaftlichen Produkte und bis zu 15% für andere Produkte. Außer-dem können eingeführte Produkte vom im-portierenden Land als „sensibel“ eingestuft werden. Diese Regelung hat zur Folge, dass Zölle beibehalten werden können. Sensible

 

Güter in der gesamten Region sind insbe-sondere Reis und ähnliche relevante Produk-te der Landwirtschaft. Regelmäßige Ausnah-men von der Zollfreiheit werden immer dann gemacht, wenn es ein Mitgliedsstaat im Hin-blick auf den moralischen Schutz der Be-völkerung und im Hinblick auf kulturelle Einrichtungen für notwendig hält.

 

Malaysia hat mit den EFTA-Staaten (Euro-pean Free Trade Area) am 20. Juli 2010 eine Joint Declaration on Closer Economic Part-nership Agreement (CEPA) unterzeichnet. Das CEPA soll die wirtschaftliche Zusam-menarbeit vertiefen und beinhaltet insbeson-dere Klauseln zum Informationsaustausch, Entwicklung von Investitionen und Handel sowie technischer Unterstützung.

 

  1. b) ASEAN Plus

 

  1. aa) ACFTA (ASEAN China Free Trade Agreement)

Das ACFTA ist in allen ASEAN Vertrags-staaten im Juli 2005 in Kraft getreten. Damit wurde das größte Freihandelsabkommens der Welt nach Anzahl der Bevölkerung (1,9 Milli-arden) und das drittgrößte nach aggregiertem Bruttoinlandsprodukt der Mitgliedsländer (6 Billionen US$) geschaffen. Es unterteilt die Reduzierung der Einfuhrzölle in drei Katego-rien:

 

  • Early Harvest Programme („EHP“), das insbesondere lebende Tiere und Lebens-mittel (Nüsse, Früchte, Milchprodukte, etc.) beinhaltet,
  • Normal Track (übrige Produkte),

 

  • Sensitive Track (strukturrelevante und sensible Produkte).

 

EHP-Produkte sind seit dem 1. Januar 2010 grundsätzlich in allen beteiligten Ländern zollfrei. Den Vertragsstaaten bleibt es aber offen, einen gewissen Anteil der von ihnen als relevant eingestuften Produkte (Sensitive Track) aufzulisten und trotzdem mit Zöllen zu belasten. Dabei handelt es sich insbe-sondere um landwirtschaftliche Produkte wie Reis. Alle übrigen Produkte, insbesondere Maschinen und Maschinenzubehör sowie Chemikalien, sind Normal-Track-Produkte, welche in den ASEAN-6 (also den 6 Grün-derstaaten) und China seit dem 1. Januar 2010 zollfrei importiert werden können. In Vietnam, Kambodscha und Myanmar wird dies noch bis 2015 dauern. Bis dahin soll der Einfuhrzoll von derzeit 5–15% auf 0% redu-ziert werden.

 

Es ist davon auszugehen, dass China die oh-nehin schon engen Handelsbeziehungen mit ASEAN deutlich intensiviert, da eine Mög-lichkeit für China besteht, sich weg von den zum Teil fremddominierten Handelsbezie-hungen mit den USA und der EU hin zu ei-nem chinesisch dominierten Handelsraum zu bewegen. Es ist zudem aufgrund des steten Wachstums auf die vielfältig vorhandenen Ressourcen im ASEAN-Raum angewiesen. Auf der anderen Seite haben einige ASEAN Mitgliedsstaaten bereits Bedenken geäußert, dass ihre Märkte mit billigen Produkten aus China überflutet werden könnten.

 

Die Schaffung dieses Freihandelsabkommens hat ferner auch Auswirkungen auf Hong-kong. Auch wenn Hongkong ein selbständi-ges Zollterritorium darstellt und damit nicht direkt von dem Freihandelsabkommen profi-tiert, so sind doch einige Synergieeffekte mit der Sonderverwaltungszone zu erkennen. Die Zuwächse der Re-Exporte aus Hongkong la-gen in den ASEAN-Mitgliedsstaaten in den letzten Jahren regelmäßig im zweistelligen Bereich. Durch die Abschaffung von Zöllen auf etwa 7.000 Produkte werden auf dem Festland investierende Hongkonger Unter-nehmen durch die einhergehenden Kosten-senkungen profitieren. Hongkong wird da-durch als Frachtumschlagsplatz an der Schnittstelle der Handelsbeziehungen zwi-schen ASEAN und China an den wachsen-den intra-asiatischen Handelsströmen parti-zipieren und folglich davon auch profitieren.

 

Im Zuge dieser Entwicklung beraten Hong-kong und ASEAN derzeit sogar über den Abschluss eines bilateralen Freihandelsab-kommens.

 

Am Rande sei auch das am 29. Juni 2010 zwischen der Volksrepublik China und Taiwan unterzeichnete Economic Cooperation Framework Agreement (ECFA) aufgrund seiner Auswirkungen auf den ASEAN-Raum erwähnt. Hiernach sollen Zolltarife im bilateralen Handel reduziert

 

werden. Unter dem „Early Harvest Program“ gelten reduzierte Zollsätze für bestimmte Produkte. So hat China beispielsweise die Zollsätze für bestimmte Plastikwerkzeuge, petrochemische Produkte, Textilien und Me-tallprodukte auf null reduziert. Im Gegenzug hat Taiwan Zölle auf petrochemische Materi-alien, Maschinen und elektronische Produkte auf null reduziet. Insgesamt hat China für 539 Güter reduzierte Zollsätze eingeführt. Taiwan hat im Gegenzug 267 Güter begüns-tigt.

 

  • AIFTA (ASEAN India Free Trade Agreement)

AIFTA sieht eine gestaffelte Reduzierung von Einfuhrzöllen für Produkte aus den je-weiligen Ländern bis 2019 vor. Auch hier gibt es die Unterscheidung zwischen Normal Track, Senstitive Track und speziellen Pro-dukten sowie eine Ausschlussliste.

 

  • AANZFTA (ASEAN Australia New Zealand Free Trade Agreement)

 

Der Einfuhrzoll von Produkten aller Art (al-so auch Autos von Australien nach Thailand bzw. Malaysia) soll langfristig bis 2020 auf 0% reduziert werden, wobei ähnliche Aus-nahmen gelten wie für das Freihan-delsabkommen mit China.

 

Ein weiteres bilaterales Abkommen zwischen Malaysia und Australien wurde im Jahre 2012 unterzeichnet und trat am 1. Januar 2013 in Kraft. Ziel ist die Reduzierung der Zölle auf etwa 99% aller Produkte bis 2017.

 

  1. c) bilaterale FTA

TAFTA, das Freihandelsabkommen zwi-schen Thailand und Australien beseitigt seit 1. Januar 2010 nahezu alle Einfuhrzölle mit wenigen Ausnahmen von landwirt-schaftlichen und kulturell relevanten Produk-ten. Damit haben Thailand und Australien bi-lateral einen früheren Zeitpunkt gewählt als es Australien mit den oben erwähnten ande-ren ASEAN-Mitgliedsstaaten getan hat. Inso-fern wird der Handel hier schon deutlich län-ger unterstützt als es zwischen Australien und den ASEAN-Staaten der Fall ist. Ebenso verhält es sich mit den Abkommen zwischen Thailand und China sowie Indien.

 

  1. d) WTO

Das GATT (General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade) in seiner Fassung von 1994 er-möglicht grundsätzlich einen zollfreien Han-del zwischen den Mitgliedsstaaten. Der Nachteil des GATT ist aber, dass zu viele Ausnahmen von der Regel der Zollfreiheit gemacht worden sind. (Die Ausnahmere-gelungen der EU füllen beispielsweise mehre-re Aktenordner.) Dies basiert häufig auf rein politisch motivierten Entscheidungen der Mitgliedsstaaten.

 

  1. Ergebnis

Jedes Abkommen bietet für sich genommen Vor- und Nachteile. Um zoll-optimiert ex-portieren zu können, bedarf es eines Ver-ständnisses für die unterschiedlichen Ab-kommen sowie praktischer Erfahrungen, da die Auslegung dieser Abkommen durch die einzelnen Staaten oftmals unterschiedlich ist. Nur so kann ein zoll-optimierter Export un-ter Ausnutzung der bestehenden Abkommen vorbereitet werden. Wir stehen Ihnen bei der Optimierung Ihrer Vorhaben gerne zur Ver-fügung.

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 109    (DE)

 

 

Synopse der Doppelbesteuerungs-abkommen von Hong Kong mit:

 

 

  • Belgien
  • Luxemburg

 

  • Niederlande
  • Österreich

 

 

 

 Obwohl Lorenz & Partners größtmögliche Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in dieser Broschüre bereitgestellten In-formationen stets auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass dies eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen kann. Lorenz & Partners übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit, Vollständigkeit oder Qualität der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners, welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässi-ges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

  1. Einleitung

 

Das Doppelbesteuerungsabkommen (DBA) zwischen Hong Kong und Österreich wurde am 25. Mai 2010 geschlossen und ist ab 2012 in Kraft getreten.

 

Am 22 März 2010 schloss Hong Kong mit den Niederlanden ein DBA ab, welches ebenfalls 2012 in Kraft getreten ist.

 

Das DBA zwischen Hong Kong und Belgi-en trat bereits 2004 in Kraft, das DBA mit Luxemburg in 2008.

 

Da das in Krafttreten der vier DBA relativ weit auseinander liegt, lohnt sich ein Ver-gleich der vier, da sich diese teilweise unter-scheiden und deshalb für Unternehmen ver-schiedene Möglichkeiten und steuerliche Gestaltungsmöglichkeiten bieten.

 

  1. Vergleich

 

  1. a) Betriebsstätte

Grundsätzlich sind die Gewinne eines Un-ternehmens nur dort zu versteuern, wo das Unternehmen seinen Sitz hat. Das heißt, ei-ne europäische Gesellschaft hat ihren Ge-winn in ihrem europäischen Sitzstaat zu ver-steuern, selbst wenn das Unternehmen mit Hong Kong oder einer Hong Kong Gesell-schaft Geschäftsbeziehungen unterhält. Dies ändert sich aber, wenn die Gesellschaft in einer Art und Weise mit Hong Kong Ge-schäfte macht, so dass in Hong Kong eine Betriebsstätte der europäischen Gesellschaft entsteht. In diesem Zeitpunkt steht dem Staat, in dem sich die Betriebstätte befindet (Hong Kong), bezüglich des Gewinns dieser Betriebsstätte das Besteuerungsrecht zu. Folglich ist die Frage, wann eine Betriebs-stätte entsteht, für die Besteuerung von grundlegender Bedeutung. Artikel 5 der DBA definiert den Begriff der Betriebs-stätte:

 

 

 

 

 

Belgien

Luxemburg

 

Niederlande

Österreich

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Einheitli-

Ort der Geschäftsleitung,

 

 

 

 

che

Vo-

Zweigniederlassungen, Fabrikationsstätten,

 

 

raus-

 

Ein- und Verkaufsstellen,

 

 

 

 

setzungen

Ständiger  Vertreter,

der  für

die

Gesellschaft  handelt  und  kein  wirt-

 

 

 

 

 

schaftliches Risiko trägt und nicht nur unterstützende Tätigkeiten oder Tä-

 

 

 

 

 

tigkeiten des Negativkatalogs (s.u.) ausübt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ständiger

Wenn der ständi-

Wenn der ständi-

Wenn der ständi-

Wenn der ständi-

 

Vertreter

ge

Vertreter über

ge Vertreter zwar

ge Vertreter über

ge Vertreter über

 

 

 

 

ein

Warenlager

nicht über Vertre-

Vertretungsmacht

Vertretungsmacht

 

 

 

 

verfügt, von dem

tungsmacht

ver-

verfügt und diese

verfügt und diese

 

 

 

 

er

gewöhnlich

fügt, er aber über

ausübt

ausübt

 

 

 

 

Aufträge der Ge-

ein

Warenlager

 

 

 

 

 

 

sellschaft bearbei-

verfügt, von

dem

 

 

 

 

 

 

tet

 

er

gewöhnlich

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aufträge der Ge-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sellschaft bearbei-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

Offshore Gewinne

 

Für den Fall, dass eine Betriebsstätte in Hong Kong entstanden ist, stellt sich die Frage, ob und wie die dort generierten Ge-winne in Hong Kong zu versteuern sind. Entscheidend für die finale Steuerfreiheit im Empfängerland ist, ob es für die Steuerfrei-stellung ausreichend ist, dass die Gewinne in Hong Kong theoretisch steuerbar sind oder aber tatsächlich versteuert werden müssen

 

(„subject to tax clause“). Hierbei kommt es bei den verschiedenen DBA zu erheblichen Unterschieden:

  Luxemburg

 

Hat eine Luxemburger Gesellschaft in Hong Kong Aktivitäten ausgeführt und ist dadurch in Hong Kong eine Betriebstätte entstanden, so ist der Gewinn der Betriebsstätte in Lu-xemburg steuerfrei gestellt, wenn nach Hong Konger Steuerrecht theoretisch die Mög-lichkeit besteht, dass der Gewinn zu ver-steuern ist, Artikel 22.2 (a) des DBA:

 

“Where a resident of Luxembourg derives income or owns capital which, in accordance with the provisions of this Agreement, may be taxed in the Hong Kong SAR, Luxem bourg shall….. exempt such income or capital from tax (…)”.

 

Zu beachten ist hierbei, dass rein auf die theoretische Möglichkeit abgestellt wird, dass der Gewinn in Hong Kong zu versteu-ern ist. Es ist nicht nötig, dass auf den Ge-winn in Hong Kong tatsächlich Steuern ge-zahlt werden.

 

Dies ist vor allem im Lichte des nationalen Hong Konger Steuerrechts zu sehen, nach-dem in Hong Kong nicht wie in den meisten anderen Ländern das Prinzip des Weltein-kommens gilt, sondern das Territorialprin-zip. Nach Artikel 14 der Inland Revenue Ordinance sind Unternehmensgewinne nur zu versteuern, wenn diese in Hong Kong entstanden oder durch eine Tätigkeit in Hong Kong entstanden sind. Ist dies nicht der Fall, liegen sogenannte „Offshore-“ Ge-

 

 

winne vor, die in Hong Kong nicht be-steuerbar sind.

 

Nach dem DBA sind diese Gewinne dann auch in Luxemburg nicht zu versteuern, da für Artikel 22.2 (a) des DBA die theoretische Möglichkeit der Besteuerung in Hong Kong ausreichend ist und es nicht darauf an-kommt, dass die Gewinne tatsächlich der Steuerpflicht in Hong Kong unterfallen.

  Belgien

 

Im Gegensatz zu Luxemburg ist für eine Steuerfreistellung der Gewinne der Hong Kong Betriebsstätte in Belgien die theoreti-sche Möglichkeit der Besteuerung der Ge-winne in Hong Kong nicht ausreichend, es ist vielmehr nötig, dass die Gewinne in Hong Kong tatsächlich auch dort zu ver-steuern sind. Artikel 22.2(a) des Belgien-Hong Kong DBA sagt demgemäß:

 

“where a resident in Belgium derives elements of in-come, … which may be taxed in Hong Kong in ac-cordance with the provisions of this Agreement, and which are taxed there, Belgium shall exempt such elements of income from tax but may, in calculating the amount of tax on the remaining income of that resident, apply the rate of tax which would have been applicable if such income had not been exempted.”

 

Demgemäß müssen Offshore Gewinne der Hong Kong Betriebsstätte in Belgien ver-steuert werden, da diese in Hong Kong nicht steuerbar sind.

  Niederlande

 

Nach dem DBA mit den Niederlanden sind die in Frage kommenden (steuerfreien) Offshore Einkünfte aus Hong Kong dann in den Niederlanden steuerfrei gestellt, wenn diese nur in Hong Kong zu versteuern wä-ren.

 

Dies ergibt sich aus Artikel 21 Abs. 2 des DBA:

 

“However, where a resident of the Netherlands de-rives items of income which according to (…), para-graph 1 of Article 7(…) of this Agreement maybe taxed or shall be taxable only in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and are included in the basis referred to in paragraph 1, the Netherlands shall exempt such items of income by allowing a reduction of its tax.”

 

Dies bedeutet, dass es auch hier, wie bei dem DBA mit Luxemburg, lediglich darauf ankommt, dass die Unternehmensgewinne der Betriebsstätte theoretisch der Besteue-rung in Hong Kong unterliegen könnten, so dass auch hier Offshore Gewinne weder in Hong Kong noch in den Niederlanden zu versteuern wären.

  Österreich

 

Nach dem DBA zwischen Hong Kong und Österreich sind Offshore Einkünfte dann in

 

Übersicht


 

Österreich steuerfrei, wenn nach Hong Konger Steuerrecht die Möglichkeit besteht, dass der Gewinn zu versteuern ist und dieser auch tatsächlich in Hong Kong versteuert wird, Artikel 22.2 (a) des DBA:

 

”Where a resident of Austria derives income or own capital which, in accordance with (…) this Agree-ment, may be taxed in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and are subject to tax therein, Austria shall (…) exempt such income or capital from tax.”

 

Demgemäß müssen Offshore Gewinne der Hong Kong Betriebsstätte in Österreich, so wie auch in Belgien, versteuert werden, da diese in Hong Kong nicht steuerbar sind.

 

 

Belgien

 

Luxemburg

 

Niederlande

 

Oesterreich

Freistellung

Artikel

7

i.V.m.

Artikel  7  i.V.m.

Artikel

7

i.V.m.

Artikel

7

i.V.m.

der Gewinne

Artikel 22 (2)a:

Artikel 22(2)a:

Artikel 21 (2):

 

Artikel 22 (2)a:

der  Betriebs-

Gewinne

müssen

Theoretische

Be-

Theoretische

Be-

Gewinne

müssen

stätte im Sitz-

in   Hong

Kong

steuerung

in

steuerung

ausrei-

in   Hong

Kong

staat

tatsächlich

ver-

Hong  Kong

aus-

chend, wenn Ge-

tatsächlich

ver-

 

steuert

 

worden

reichend (Offsho-

winne

nur

in

steuert

 

worden

 

sein.

 

 

re  Gewinne

blei-

Hong Kong steu-

sein.

 

 

 

(Offshore

Ge-

ben steuerfrei)

erpflichtig

 

 

(Offshore

Ge-

 

winne

müssen  in

 

 

(Offshore

 

Ge-

winne

müssen  in

 

Belgien versteuert

 

 

winne steuerfrei)

Österreich

ver-

 

werden.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

steuert werden.)

 

 

  1. b) Dividendenbesteuerung

Durch ein DBA kann sich die Quellensteuer auf Dividenden verringern. Eine weitere Re-duzierung der Dividendenbesteuerung kann in Betracht kommen, wenn eine Gesellschaft einen Großteil der Aktien des anderen Un-

 

ternehmens hält. Da aber zurzeit Hong Kong keine Dividendenbesteuerung kennt, ist hier ausschließlich der Fall zu betrachten, dass eine Hong Kong Gesellschaft von einer Gesellschaft in Belgien/ Niederlande/ Lu-xemburg oder Österreich Dividenden erhält:

 

 

 

 

Belgien

 

Luxemburg

Niederlande

Österreich

 

 

 

Quellenbesteue-

Grundsätz-

Grundsätz-

Grundsätz-

Grundsaetz-

 

rung   der   Divi-

 

lich 15%

 

lich 10%

 

lich 10%

 

lich 10 %

 

 

 

denden

Hält

die

Hält

die

Hält

die

Hält

die

 

 

 

Hong

 

 

Hong

 

 

Hong

 

 

Hong

 

 

 

 

 

Konger  Ge-

 

Konger  Ge-

 

Konger  Ge-

 

Konger

Ge-

 

 

 

sellschaft

 

sellschaft

 

sellschaft

 

sellschaft

 

 

 

 

 

mind.

10%

 

mind.

10%

 

mind.

10%

 

mind.  10

%

 

 

 

an der belgi-

 

des  Kapitals

 

des Kapitals,

 

des   Kapitals

 

 

 

schen

Ge-

 

oder

ist  sie

und

 

wenn

 

dann 0 %

 

 

 

sellschaft,

 

mit

mind.

die

Anteile

 

 

 

 

 

 

dann 5%

 

1,2

Millio-

öffentlich an

 

 

 

 

 

 

–   Hält

die

 

nen

Euro

einer

Börse

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hong

 

 

beteiligt,

gehandelt

 

 

 

 

 

 

Konger  Ge-

 

dann 0%

werden,

 

 

 

 

 

 

sellschaft

 

 

 

oder

 

mind.

 

 

 

 

 

 

mind.

25%

 

 

 

50%

 

der

 

 

 

 

 

 

an der belgi-

 

 

 

Anteile  von

 

 

 

 

 

 

schen

Ge-

 

 

 

einer Gesell-

 

 

 

 

 

 

sellschaft

 

 

 

schaft gehal-

 

 

 

 

 

 

innerhalb

 

 

 

ten

werden,

 

 

 

 

 

 

der

letzten

 

 

 

deren Antei-

 

 

 

 

 

 

12  Monate,

 

 

 

le  öffentlich

 

 

 

 

 

 

dann 0%

 

 

 

an

 

einer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Börse

ge-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

handelt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

werden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dann 0%,.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. c) Zinsen

 

Auch die maximale Quellenabzugssteuer bei Zinszahlungen ändert sich durch ein DBA. Da aber weder Hong Kong noch Luxem-burg oder die Niederlande zurzeit Zinsen besteuern, ist vorliegend nur der Fall zu be-trachten, dass Zinsen von Belgien oder Ös-terreich nach Hong Kong gezahlt werden

 

(normalerweise liegt die Quellensteuer auf Zinsen in Belgien zurzeit bei 35% und in Österreich bei 25 %). Da Zinsen in Hong Kong steuerfrei sind werden Zinsen, die von Österreich nach Hong Kong bezahlt wer-den, nur in Österreich besteuert, allerdings zu einem niedrigeren Steuersatz werden.

 

 

 

Belgien

Luxemburg

Niederlande

Österreich

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quellenbesteuerung

35%

0%

0%

25 %

auf Zinsen ohne

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DBA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maximale Besteue-

10%

0%

0%

0 %

rung mit DBA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. d) Quellensteuer auf Lizenzgebühren

 

Da zurzeit weder Belgien noch die Nieder-lande, Luxemburg oder Österreich eine Quellensteuer auf Lizenzgebühren erheben,

 

kommen die niedrigeren Steuersätze nur in Betracht, wenn Lizenzgebühren aus Hong Kong an einen Empfänger in Europa ge-zahlt werden.

 

 

 

Belgien

Luxemburg

 

Niederlande

Österreich

Lizenzge-

–   5%   des   Ge-

–   3%   des

Ge-

–   3%   des   Ge-

3%   des   Ge-

bühren

samtbetrags

samtbetrags

samtbetrags

samtbetrags

 

der Gebühren

der Gebühren

der Gebühren

der Gebühren

 

  1. Abschließende Bewertung

 

Die vier DBA stimmen in vielen Punkten überein, da sie alle auf dem Muster DBA der OECD basieren und nur in bestimmten Tei-len abgeändert wurden. Allerdings bietet das Luxemburg DBA und das Niederlande DBA vor allem bei Offshore Gewinnen in Hong Kong einen großen Vorteil.

 

 

Von Luxemburg oder den Niederlanden aus besteht dann unter bestimmten Konstellati-onen die Möglichkeit, die steuerfreien Offshore Gewinne aufgrund von Europa-recht weiter in andere EU Länder steuerfrei auszuschütten (Mutter-Tochter-Richtlinie), so dass dies für europäische Unternehmen ein sehr attraktiver Weg sein kann, ihre Be-teiligungen in Hong Kong und/oder Asien zu strukturieren.