Newsletter No. 139 (EN)

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign Direct Investment in China

Wholly Foreign-Owned Enterprise (WFOE)

 

vs.

Representative Office

 

 

 

October 2014

 

 

 

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information pro-vided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

 

Table of Content

 

 

  1. Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4

 

  1. Wholly Foreign Owned Enterprises in China………………………………………………………… 4

 

  1. What is a Wholly Foreign Owned Enterprise (“WFOE”)?………………………………………. 4

 

  1. Different Types of WFOE…………………………………………………………………………………. 4

 

  1. Scope of Business……………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

 

  1. Registered Capital of a WFOE……………………………………………………………………………. 5

 

  1. Application Procedure……………………………………………………………………………………….. 6

 

  1. Further Registration Procedures………………………………………………………………………….. 7

 

  1. Taxation of WFOEs………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7

 

  1. Advantages of a WFOE…………………………………………………………………………………….. 7

 

III.      Representative Offices (“RO”) in China………………………………………………………….. 7

 

  1. Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8

 

  1. Purpose of setting up a RO………………………………………………………………………………… 8

 

  1. Procedure for setting up a RO…………………………………………………………………………….. 9

 

  1. Employment with the RO………………………………………………………………………………… 10

 

  1. Taxation of ROs……………………………………………………………………………………………… 10

 

  1. Comparison of WFOE and RO………………………………………………………………………. 11

 

  1. When to use a WFOE……………………………………………………………………………………… 11

 

  1. When to use a RO…………………………………………………………………………………………… 11

 

  1. Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………………. Error! Bookmark not defined.

 

 

 

 

 

Abbreviations

AoA

Articles of Association

BoD

Board of Directors

BVI

British Virgin Islands

CCPIT

China Council for the Promotion of Inter-

CIETAC

national Trade

China International Economic and Trade

CL

Arbitration Centre

Chinese Company Law

COFTEC

Commission of Foreign Trade and Eco-

DR

nomic Cooperation

Delta Regions

EIT

Enterprise Income Tax

ETDZ

Economic  and  Technological  Develop-

FDI

ment Zone

Foreign Direct Investment

FESCO

Foreign Enterprise Service Company

FIC

Foreign Investment Catalogue

FIE

Foreign Invested Enterprise

JMC

Joint Management Committee

MOF

Ministry of Finance

MOFCOM

Ministry of Commerce

NDRC

National   Development   and   Reform

NPC

Commission

National People’s Congress

OCZ

Open Coastal Zones

RMB

Renminbi Yuan

RO

Representative Office

SAFE

State Administration of Foreign Exchange

SAIC

State Administration of Industry and Com-

SASAC

merce

State-owned Assets Supervision and Ad-

 

ministration  Commission  of  the  State

SAT

Council

State Administration of Taxation

SEZ

Special Economic Zone

SSEZ

Shenzhen Special Economic Zone

WFOE

Wholly Foreign Owned Enterprise

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

As a foreign investor, incorporating a company (Foreign Invested Enterprises, FIE) in China is only possible upon approval by the relevant gov-ernment authorities. Whether such approval is granted depends on the intended project and is subject to the “Provisions in Guiding the Ori-entation of Foreign Investment” (“Foreign Investment Provisions”), as promulgated in 2002 and modernised in December 2011.

 

Foreign investors who wish to set up an en-tity in China will need to decide on a specific form of incorporation. Three forms of in-corporation are available under Chinese law, while two of them, the Wholly F oreign-Owned Enterprises (WFOE ) and the Repre-sentative Offices (RO) can be seen as the more popular investment vehicles. There are some significant legal and factual differences between those two investment forms, espe-cially regarding their permitted scope of ac-tivity. Unfortunately, many foreign investors still do not fully comprehend or appreciate these differences when making their in-vestment choice.

 

This Newsletter has therefore been designed to assist potential investors in understanding these differences by highlighting the main functions, abilities and limitations of each in-vestment vehicle.

 

  1. Wholly Foreign Owned Enter-

prises in China

 

  • What is a Wholly Foreign Owned En-terprise (“WFOE”)?

 

A WFOE is an investment vehicle for for-eigners who wish to establish a company in China. A WFOE is a limited liability com-pany owned entirely by foreign nationals and can be seen as an independent legal entity separate from its investor. Shareholders en-joy limited liability up to the amount of their capital contribution. For these purposes, the term “foreign national” includes individuals

 

 

or organisations based in Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. Therefore, while Chi-nese nationals cannot directly invest in a WFOE, they can set up a company in Hong Kong, British Virgin Islands (“BVI”) etc and use such ‘foreign” company as a shareholder in a WFOE.

 

The laws governing WFOEs in China are:

 

  • The Law of the People’s Republic of China on Wholly Foreign-Owned Enter-prises (“WFOE Law”);
  • The Detailed Implementing Rules for the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Wholly Foreign Owned Enter-prises (“WFOE Rules”)

 

If an issue is not covered by these provi-sions, then the following general Chinese company laws will apply:

 

  • The Company Law of the People’s Re-public of China (last amended on 01 March 2014); and

 

  • The Contract Law of the People’s Re-public of China

 

  1. Different Types of WFOE

 

When the WFOE was originally introduced, China’s aim was to attract foreign investors in manufacturing and advanced technology. However, China’s accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 2001 made it necessary to open up the WFOEs to many other industries e.g. consulting, management services, software development and trade. Further, there are certain areas where WFOEs are particularly encouraged, e.g. those which provide new products for ex-ports, which save energy and raw materials or which upgrade and replace existing prod-ucts (Art. 3 WFOE Law). As WFOEs in different sectors are sometimes subject to different requirements, it has become com-mon practice to sub-classify them into three key categories:

 

 

  • WFOEs in the manufacturing sector (“Manufacturing WFOE”)
  • WFOEs in the consulting and service sector (“Consulting WFOE”)

 

  • WFOEs in the trading, wholesale, retail or franchise sector (“Trading WFOE”)

 

These WFOEs basically have the same company structure and are all subject to the same WFOE regulations. The only differ-ence concerns the establishment require-ments, e.g. registered capital, approval pro-cedures and documentation.

 

  1. Scope of Business

 

China’s current regulations do not recognise ‘shelf’ WFOEs. Therefore, the first stage in setting up any WFOE is to determine its scope of business. In general, China espe-cially encourages businesses which are bene-ficial to the development of the national economy and yield notable economic bene-fits (Art. 3 WFOE Law). More specific de-tails on permitted/prohibited business areas can be found in the Foreign Investment Catalogue (“FIC”), as compiled by the Na-tional Development and Reform Commis-sion (“NDRC”) and the Ministry of Com-merce (“MOFCOM”) according to the Foreign Investment Provisions.

 

All business areas carried out by foreign in-vested projects must fall into 1 of the fol-lowing 4 categories according to the FIC:

 

  • Encouraged
  • Restricted
  • Prohibited
  • Permitted – being any industry which is not listed in the above 3 categories

 

The FIC is periodically revised; the latest version came into force on 10 June 2013.

 

Investors should carefully plan their long and short term business and seek legal ad-vice before submitting the establishment application as WFOEs are only permitted to

 

 

conduct business within the approved busi-ness scope which appears on the business license. For example, a Consulting WFOE is only allowed to offer consulting services and is therefore not allowed to manufacture goods. Any contravention will be fined or, in the worst case, result in a shut down of the company by the authorities. Moreover, any amendment or change to the business scope must be approved by the authorities, the process of which can be time- consuming and costly.

 

  1. Registered Capital of a WFOE

 

As a limited liability company, all WFOEs are required to have a registered capital (Art. 18 WFOE Rules). Until the revision of the Company Law, a minimum registered capital amount of RMB 30,000 (approx. EUR 3,300) was required. However, since the new Company Law came into effect on 01 March 2014, no minimum capital is required any-more. However, Art 20 WFOE Rules states that the registered capital amount must cor-respond with the WFOE’s scope of busi-ness. Therefore, the actual minimum regis-tered capital required by the licensing au-thorities will vary from case to case depend-ing on the WFOE’s business scope and lo-cation (e.g. less capital is required to estab-lish a business in a second tier city like Hangzhou compared to Shanghai). The fol-lowing list can be used as a basic guideline:

 

Recommended Registered Capital

Consulting

RMB 100,000 – 500,000

WFOE

(approx.

EUR

11,000–

 

54,000)

 

 

Trading

RMB 500,000 – 1 Million

WFOE

(approx.

EUR

54,000–

 

110,000)

 

 

Manufacturing

RMB 1 Million

 

WFOE

(approx. EUR 110,000)

 

Please note that in practice a registered capi-tal of RMB 1 Million (approx. EUR 110,000) is recommended for all kind of WFOEs, since an application for the establishment of a WFOE with a higher registered capital is more likely to be approved by the Chinese authorities.

Furthermore, the requirement to pay up the registered capital within a certain period of time as stipulated by the former Company Law (20% of the registered capital within three months of the company’s registration, and the full amount within two years from the issuance of the business license) has been abolished. It is now in the discretion of the approval authority to decide within which time the capital needs to be paid up by the shareholders. Shareholders can now also decide to contribute their entire share capital as in- kind investment (before, at least 30% needed to be contributed in cash).

 

  1. Application Procedure

 

The Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM) is officially authorised to examine and approve applications for the establishment of a WFOE. However, this responsibility is usu-ally delegated to the local authorities (Art. 7 WFOE Rules).

 

(a) Preliminary Reports

 

Before filing a formal application, the inves-tors must submit a preliminary report to the local authorities of the province or city where they plan to establish their WFOE (Art. 9 WFOE Rules). This report should cover the following topics:

 

  • The purpose of the WFOE
  • The scope and scale of the proposed business

 

  • The products to be produced or the ser-vices to be provided

 

  • The technology and equipment to be used
  • The land area and requirements
  • The conditions for and quantities of wa-ter, electricity, coal, gas or other energy sources required
  • Requirements for public facilities


 

The local authorities should respond to this report within 30 days of receipt (Art. 9 WFOE Rules). However, since it is at the authorities’ discretion to demand that the in-vestors provide further documentation or clarification, the 30 day deadline may be ex-ceeded.

 

(b) Formal Application for the establishment of the WFOE

 

Once the preliminary report has been ap-proved, the investors can proceed with the formal application procedure. Pursuant to Art. 10 WFOE Rules, the following applica-tion documents must be submitted to the lo-cal authorities:

 

  • Application for the establishment of the WFOE;
  • Feasibility Study;
  • Articles of Association (“AoA”) of the WFOE;
  • Name of the WFOE’s legal representa-tive (or a list of the members of the Board of Directors);
  • Establishment certificates and a certifi-cate of creditworthiness for each inves-tor;
  • The local authorities’ written reply to the preliminary report;
  • List of supplies that need to be imported for the WFOE’s business lines; and
  • Other relevant documents.

 

If there are multiple investors, at least one copy of the contract which has been signed between them (i.e. Shareholders Agreement) must also be submitted to the local authori-ties.

 

The documents listed in points 1- 3 must be prepared in Chinese. All the other docu-ments may be submitted to the authorities in any foreign language as long as a Chinese translation is attached.

 

After submitting all the required documents, the authorities have 90 days to examine, ap-prove or reject the application (Art. 11 WFOE Rules). If the application is ap-proved, an approval certificate will be issued.

 

(c) Business Licence

 

Once the approval certificate has been is-sued, the foreign investors have 30 days to register with the applicable local authorities in order to obtain a business licence (Art. 12 WFOE Rules). If the foreign investors fail to apply for a business licence within these 30 days, the approval certificate will auto-matically expire. Once the business licence has been issued, the WFOE will exist as a legal entity.

 

(d) Office address of the WFOE

 

It is important to note that the foreign in-vestor must rent business premises before submitting the formal establishment applica-tion. A copy of the applicable tenancy agree-ment must be submitted to the authorities upon their request. Virtual office addresses are currently not accepted by the Chinese licensing authorities.

 

  1. Further Registration Procedures

 

Once the business licence has been issued, the WFOE must register with several addi-tional authorities before it may commence its business activities. Most importantly, the WFOE must register with the local and state tax authorities in order to obtain a tax num-ber which will enable the WFOE to pay its monthly taxes.

 

Furthermore, the WFOE must open a bank account with a designated bank in China. The company needs a foreign currency capi-tal account and a local RMB currency ac-count. The shareholders must pay the cur-rency registered capital (e.g. USD or EUR) into the capital account in a foreign cur-rency. The capital will then be converted into RMB and transferred into the RMB ac-count where it is placed at the company’s disposal.

 

 

  1. Taxation of WFOEs

 

As an independent legal entity, the WFOE is subject to corporate income tax like any other company in China. The uniform cor-porate income tax rate of 25% applies. WFOEs may also be subject to VAT of 17% for trade in goods. As of 1 August 2013, the new VAT system for services has expanded to cover China entirely. Consequently, WFOEs providing services will be subject to the new rates of either 6% or 11%, depend-ing on the services rendered.

 

A uniform services VAT rate of 3% applies to companies with annual gross revenue of less than 5 million RMB.

 

  1. Advantages of a WFOE

 

Some of the key advantages of a WFOE in comparison with other investment vehicles are:

 

  1. Separate legal entity with limited liability for the shareholders
  2. Independence and freedom to imple-ment the strategies of the parent com-pany without having to consider the in-volvement of a Chinese partner;

 

  1. Ability to formally carry out business rather than merely functioning as a rep-resentative office

 

  1. Being able to issue invoices to customers in RMB and receive revenue in RMB

 

  1. Ability to convert RMB profits into other currencies for remittance abroad to the parent company;

 

  1. Protection of intellectual know-how and technology;
  2. For Manufacturing WFOEs, there are no special requirements, such as im-port/export licenses for its own prod-ucts;

 

  1. Full control of human resources;
  2. Greater efficiency in operations, man-agement and future development.

 

  • Representative Offices (“RO”) in China

 

  1. Introduction

 

As noted above, over the past twenty years China has increasingly opened up to outside investment. As we have seen, one of the in-vestment methods available to foreign inves-tors is the WFOE. However, for some in-vestors, setting up an entirely new entity is too big a step to take in a new, distant and unfamiliar business environment. Therefore, the Chinese government has created an in-vestment vehicle which allows foreign inves-tors to sample the Chinese market and es-tablish local contacts before committing themselves to full market entry. This vehicle is the Representative Office (“RO”).

 

Representative Offices were first introduced during the 1980’s. However, modern ROs are governed by new regulations which were promulgated in 2010 and 2011:

 

  1. Regulations on Administration of Regis-tration of Resident Offices of Foreign Enterprises (the “Regulations”), promul-gated on 19 November 2010, effective 01 March 2011
  2. Circular on Further Strengthening the Administration of Registration of For-eign Enterprise Resident Representative Offices (“Circular”), promulgated and effective on 04 January 2010

 

  1. Provisional Measures for the Tax Collec-tion and Administration of Representa-tive Office of Foreign Enterprises (“Tax Measures”), Guoshuifa (2010), No. 18, promulgated and effective on 20 Febru-ary 2010.

 

Besides the above, many more RO related regulations have been passed by the various provincial and city authorities. Therefore it is crucial that new investors investigate the lo-cal regulations of the area where they intend to establish their RO.

 

  1. Purpose of setting up a RO


 

An RO is not a legal entity in itself but merely the representative of the foreign par-ent company. Consequently, one key advan-tage of ROs is that all the start up costs can be directly attributed to the parent company and can therefore be treated as expenses of that parent company for income tax pur-poses. Similarly, the parent company can be held directly liable for actions of the repre-sentative.

 

As the RO is only a representative of the parent company in China, its functions are limited. Specifically, Article 14 of the Regu-lations states:

 

“A representative office may engage in the activities related to the business of foreign enterprises as fol-lows:

  1. Market surveys, displays and campaigns related to the products or services of foreign enterprise; and
  2. liaison activities connected with sales of the prod-uct of foreign enterprise, service providing, domestic procurement and investment.

 

In case laws, administrative regulations or the State Council provides that a representative office shall be approved while engaging in the business activities as prescribed above, it should gain approval.”

 

The functions of an RO can therefore be summarized as:

 

  • Providing a presence for the parent company in China;

 

  • Providing the parent company with of-fice infrastructure in China;

 

  • Supervising the activities of distributors;

 

  • Developing and assisting the sales activi-ties of the parent company;

 

  • Liaising with customers, suppliers and government authorities on the parent company’s behalf;

 

  • Providing product training and informa-tion to distributors; and

 

  • Organising/coordinating advertising and seminars for the products of the parent company.

 

Further Article 13 of the Regulations clearly states that “A representative office shall not conduct profit-making activities”.

 

Therefore, an RO is not permitted to sign any contract or carry out any activities for payment. However, in the past, many ROs have gone far beyond these limitations to conduct direct profit- making activities which are reserved for Joint Ventures (“JVs”) and WFOEs. Thus, these ROs not only breached the law with respect to their business scope but also deprived the Chi-nese government of vast amounts of reve-nue as ROs were not subject to corporate income tax. Consequently, the Chinese au-thorities introduced the new stricter 2010/2011 RO rules.

 

  1. Procedure for setting up an RO

 

The procedure for establishing an RO is quite similar to that of establishing a WFOE. Setting up an RO normally takes 3 to 4 months, depending on the location. How-ever, if the parent company wishes to estab-lish the RO in a restricted area, additional permits and approvals will be required. For example, ROs in the banking, financial, transportation, education or legal sector re-quire the approval of the relevant supervis-ing authorities. Only after such approval has been granted, via an Approval Certificate, can the application procedure with the SAIC continue.

 

  1. Registration

 

The application process for setting up an RO in China begins with an application let-ter from the foreign parent company to the respective authority. Article 23 of the Regu-lation states:

 

“Applying for the establishment of a representative office, a foreign enterprise should submit to the regis-tration authority the following documents and mate-rials:

(1) application for registration of establishment of representative office;


 

  1. domicile certification of the foreign enterprise and business license valid for more than 2years;
  2. articles of association or organisation agreement of the foreign enterprise;
  3. commission documents issued by the foreign en-terprise to chief representative and representative;
  4. identification papers and resumes of chief repre-sentative and representative;
  5. certificate of capital credit issued by financial institution having business ties with the foreign en-terprise; and
  6. the certification for the lawful right to use the residency site of the representative office.”

 

Further, similar to a WFOE, another pre-condition for setting up an RO is the exis-tence of a tenancy agreement for the RO’s future business premises. There are several ways to satisfy this condition. The parent company could sublease an office from a service agency. However, some local au-thorities are not familiar with service compa-nies and therefore may reject such ar-rangements. Another possibility is for the parent company to rent office space and to insert a clause in the lease whereby the RO will automatically take over the premises upon its establishment.

 

In China it is within the authorities’ discre-tion to request supplementations or amendments to the application from the in-vestor. Such supplementations or additions can result in significant delays, as each new document needs to be translated into Chi-nese and usually has to be affixed with an Apostille.

 

Once the State Administration of Industry and Commerce (SAIC) has successfully ap-proved the application, a Registration Cer-tificate will be issued and the RO will offi-cially be established.

 

  1. Post registration procedures

 

After the Registration Certificate has been issued, several additional formalities must be completed before the RO can begin to oper-ate. Whether all or only some of these formalities are required depends on the RO’s business sector.

 

  • Registration with the local and state tax authority
  • Registration with the local customs au-thority

 

  • Registration with a local bank to open a foreign exchange account and an RMB account

 

  • Registration with the Public Security Bu-reau (PSB) i.e. China’s police force
  • Obtaining an organisation code and an organisation code certificate from the General Administration of Quality Su-pervision, Inspection and Quarantine of the PRC or its designated local bureau

 

Registering with the tax authorities and opening the bank accounts are the most im-portant procedures and apply to all ROs re-gardless of their business sector.

 

Prior to 2011, the registration of an RO was granted for three years, after which it was subject to renewal. According to the new regulations, ROs must apply for renewal of their registration annually.

 

  1. Employment with the RO

 

Once the RO has been set up and is ready to commence business, the next step is to hire employees.

 

  1. Local employees

 

An RO may employ an unlimited number of local Chinese employees. However, accord-ing to the new regulations, ROs are not permitted to directly recruit or enter into employment agreements with local employ-ees. Instead, this must be done via a third party service provider. These service provid-ers are commonly known as a Foreign En-terprise Service Company (“FESCO”). The FESCO will enter into an employment agreement with the local employee and then dispatch the employee to the RO. The em-

 

 

ployees will receive their salary and social benefits from the FESCO. The FESCO will then charge the RO for their services plus the salary and social contributions which have been paid on their behalf. The ROs are permitted to pay additional benefits, such as bonuses or any other allowances directly to the employees.

 

  1. Foreign employees

 

Unlike local employees, ROs are allowed to hire and employ foreign employees directly, without the involvement of a FESCO. The regulations, however, place a limit on the number of foreign employees an RO is per-mitted to employ. Only 4 foreigners may be employed by an RO at any given time. Of these four foreigners, one must be ap-pointed as the “Chief Representative” while the other three must be appointed as “Rep-resentatives”. This rule applies to existing ROs seeking to renew their registration, as well as to new ROs registering for the first time. Any income that the foreigners receive for work performed in China is taxable un-der the Chinese income tax laws.

 

In addition to fulfilling the above quota re-quirement, all foreigners working in China must also hold a work visa. As in many other countries, it is an offence to enter China on a tourist visa and take up paid em-ployment. If these rules are breached, the employee, the RO and the parent company will be fined and the employee could be de-ported from China and banned from re-en-try.

 

  1. Taxation of ROs

 

Although ROs are not permitted to generate profits, they are usually required to pay tax in China. While some ROs are granted tax exemption, investors should not rely on this when planning the establishment of their RO. The rules on the taxation of ROs changed in 2010 in response to the habit of investors using the RO to conduct profit-making business in China. The key legislation governing the taxation of ROs is now the Provisional Measures for the Tax Col-lection and Administration of Representa-tive Office of Foreign Enterprises (Gu-oshuifa (2010) No. 18), issued on 20 Febru-ary 2010 by the State Administration of Taxation (SAT), effective on 01 January 2010. Article 3 states:

 

“The RO shall file Corporate Income Tax based on its attributed income, as well as Business Tax and Value Added Tax on its taxable income in accor-dance with the relevant laws and regulations.”

 

Further, Article 6 states that each RO must have accounting books which comply with all applicable laws and regulations. The minimum deemed profit rate is now 15%, as opposed to 10% prior to 2011.

 

If an RO is unable to properly maintain its accounting books, or calculate its expenses and costs, or if the authorities believe that the RO has not objectively declared its taxes as required, then the authorities shall have the power to adopt one of two different methods to determine the RO’s taxable in-come (Article 7):

 

Expenses- plus Method

 

Under this method the RO’s taxable income is determined on the basis of its revenue mi-nus its expenses. Expenses which may be considered under this method are:

 

  • Salaries, bonuses, allowances and welfare allowances

 

  • Cost of equipment and immovable property
  • Communication expenses
  • Travelling and accommodation ex-penses
  • Other valid business expenses

 

Please note that expenses such as charitable donations and late payment fees/fines can-not be considered.

 

  • Actual Revenue Deemed Profit Method

 

 

 

 

This method will be used when the RO can ascertain its revenue, but cannot calculate its expenses. Therefore, the total revenue of the RO is multiplied with the deemed profits rate and then the enterprise income tax rate is applied.

 

  1. Comparison of WFOE     and

RO

 

A RO can be an ideal way of entering into the Chinese market without spending the time and resources required to establish a WFOE. However, a RO is not a separate legal entity.

 

There is no set rule to determine whether a WFOE or a RO is better for any particular investor. The investor must consider the specific circumstances of his investment in China, both internal and external, before making a decision.

 

  1. When to use a WFOE

 

Setting up a WFOE is particularly useful for companies that are seeking long term invest-ment in China. Further, as there is no re-striction on the employment of foreign na-tionals for WFOEs, these entities are free to fully utilize the knowledge and special skills of the parent company’s employees in order to develop their business. This is especially useful for manufacturing investors when the goods concerned have not been previously produced in China so that the knowledge of the local employees is limited. Moreover, if the company manufactures high-end prod-ucts, it is noteworthy that the intellectual property rights of a WFOE do not need to be transferred to a Chinese partner (as is the case with a Joint Venture). Setting up a WFOE also makes sense for those engaged in trade activities, as it is possible to freely convert RMB profits into any other kind of currency.

 

  1. When to use a RO

 

As noted above, a RO is a relatively inex-pensive way to enter into the Chinese mar-ket. For example, unlike a WFOE, there is no minimum capital/investment require-ment for a RO. For investors who are not familiar with the Chinese market or culture, and are merely seeking to test the market and establish a preliminary network, a RO would be the optimal investment choice.

 

However, investors must bear in mind that setting up a RO is only recommended when no profit- making activities are to be con-ducted in China. Considering the recently amended regulations and the new vigour with which the authorities are now auditing ROs, it may be wiser for investors to estab-lish a WFOE in the first place to avoid complications. Further, it should be noted that some investors may find it difficult to carry out even these limited activities with only 4 foreign national employees (Art. 11).

 

  • Conclusion

In conclusion, a WFOE is the best legal form for investors who wish to conduct “real” business in China and do not wish to cooperate with a Chinese partner.

 

In recent years, it has become very popular to conduct busi¬ness activities under a RO. This was and remains illegal and is now un-der stricter surveillance of the Chi¬nese au-thorities. The amendments to the regulations governing ROs were made precisely to counter such illegal action, resulting in higher taxes and increased restrictions. Consequently, setting up a RO instead of a WFOE may not be cheaper or easier.

 

 

 

Attachment

 

The below table has been designed to give an overview of the different issues that need to be considered when choosing between a WFOE and RO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WFOE

Rep Office

Registered Capital

at least RMB 30,000

None

Legal entity

Yes

No

Time for set up

3-4 months

3-4 months

Number of Foreign Employ-

No Limit

Max. 4

ees

 

 

Number of local employees

No limit

No limit, but must be em-

 

 

ployed via FESCO

Costs

Attributable to the WFOE

Attributable to the parent

 

 

company

Structure

Shareholders’ Meeting, Board

Legal Representative

 

of Directors, Chairman, Legal

 

 

Rep, Supervisor

 

Functions

Doing business on own be-

To represent the parent com-

 

half

pany in China

Contracts

Can conclude contracts in

Not allowed to enter into

 

own name

contracts

Invoicing

Can issue own invoices and

Not allowed to issue invoices

 

receive RMB payments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 141 (DE)


 

 

 

 

 

 

Kurzfristige Geschäftstätigkeit in Hongkong

 

 

Gesellschafts- und steuerrechtliche Rahmenbedingungen

 

 

 

Februar 2015

 

 

 

 

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners (Hong Kong) Ltd. größtmögliche Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesem Newsletter bereitgestellten Informationen stets auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass dieser eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen kann. Lorenz & Partners Ltd. übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit und Vollständigkeit der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners Ltd., welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nut-zung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners (Hong Kong) Ltd. kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

 

  1. Einführung

 

Hongkong ist eines der wenigen Länder, das regelmäßig einen Jahresüberschuss erwirtschaf-tet. Dieser betrug für das Finanzjahr 2013/2014 6,5 Milliarden Euro. In den letzten Jahren ist die Hongkonger Regierung mehr und mehr dazu übergegangen, einen Teil dieses Überschusses in große Infrastrukturprojekte zu investieren, wie den Ausbau des U-Bahn Sys-tems (MTR), den Ausbau der Schnellbahnstre-cke nach Shenzhen und weiter nach Guang-zhou und die Hongkong-Zhuhai-Macau Brü-cke, die im Jahr 2016 fertig gestellt werden soll. Hierbei kommen in nicht unerheblichem Aus-maße bei Ausschreibungen ausländische Ge-sellschaften zum Zuge, da Hongkong nur rela-tiv wenige Firmen hat, die solch große Infra-strukturprojekte bewerkstelligen können. Wei-terhin sind Ausschreibungen in Hongkong re-lativ fair und transparent, was ausländischen Gesellschaften die gleichen Chancen wie Hongkonger Firmen einräumt.

 

Dieser Newsletter soll einen Überblick über die Voraussetzungen, unter denen ausländische Gesellschaften in Hongkong tätig werden kön-nen, geben, vor allem im Hinblick darauf, dass es sich oft nur um zeitlich begrenzte Projekte handelt. Für solche Projekte sind bezüglich Ar-beits-, Gesellschafts- und vor allem Steuerrecht bestimmte Besonderheiten zu berücksichtigen, die hier näher erläutert werden sollen.

 

Die Möglichkeiten, wie ausländische Gesell-schaften in Hongkong tätig werden können, sind im Wesentlichen:

 

 

  • Gründung einer eigenen Hongkong Ge-sellschaft als Tochtergesellschaft des deutschen Mutterhauses

 

  • Anmeldung einer Betriebsstätte der deut-schen Gesellschaft in Hongkong

 

  • Gründung eines Joint Ventures (JV) mit einem lokalen Partnerunternehmen. Dies ist wiederum in zwei Varianten möglich:

 

  • Incorporated (oder Equity) JV, d.h. das JV wird in das Handelsregister eingetragen und es entsteht eine neue juristische Person.

 

  • Contractual JV: Zusammenarbeit auf-grund eines schuldrechtlichen Vertra-ges ohne Eintragung ins Handelsregister. Es entsteht keine neue juristische Person; die Rechte und Pflichten verbleiben bei den JV Partnern.

 

  • Gründung einer neuen Hongkong Gesellschaft

 

  • Gründung einer Hongkong Gesell-schaft

 

Eine Hongkong Gesellschaft (Hongkong Ltd.) ist eine Gesellschaft mit beschränkter Haftung, und die gängige Rechtsform einer privaten Ge-sellschaft in Hongkong. Die Gründung einer Hongkong Ltd. ist mit relativ geringem Kosten- und Zeitaufwand verbunden. Für die Gründung sind lediglich ein Direktor und ein Gesellschafter als Organe der Gesellschaft nö-tig, wobei eine Person beide Positionen ausfül-len kann. Dabei kann sowohl eine natürliche als auch eine juristische Person Direktor und/ oder Gesellschafter sein. Nach der neuen Companies Ordinance muss zumindest einer der Direktoren eine natürliche Person sein. Ein physisch existentes Büro muss nicht vorhanden sein, vielmehr kann eine Gesellschaft auch un-ter einer Hongkonger Briefkastenadresse registriert werden. Es gibt keine Vorschriften über ein Mindestkapital (theoretisch 1 HKD, ca. 10 Cent) und es gibt keine Verpflichtung, das Kapital oder einen Teil davon tatsächlich einzuzahlen. Ausstehendes Kapital ist nicht zu verzinsen. Die Gesellschafter haften bis zur Höhe ihrer Beteiligung, solange das Kapital noch nicht (voll) eingezahlt ist.

 

Der Gesellschaftsvertrag (Articles of Associ-ation) muss von allen Gesellschaftern unter-schrieben und bei der Anmeldung mit abge-geben werden, wobei in Hongkong jedoch üb-licherweise Standard Articles verwendet wer-den. Eine Beglaubigung/Beurkundung des Vertrages oder der Unterschriften ist nicht nö-tig. Von der Einreichung der Unterlagen bis zur Eintragung ins Handelsregister dauert es ca. vier bis sieben Arbeitstage. Die Eröffnung eines Bankkontos bei einer lokalen Bank benö-tigt nochmals ca. sieben Arbeitstage, vorausge-setzt sämtliche Unterlagen wurden ordnungs-gemäß eingereicht.

 

Zu beachten ist, dass nach § 138 Abs. 2 Nr. 1 AO die Gründung einer neuen Gesellschaft im Ausland dem zuständigen Finanzamt angezeigt werden muss.

 

  1. Liquidation einer Hongkong Gesell-schaft

 

Hat die Gesellschaft ihr Projekt und damit ihre Geschäfte in Hongkong beendet, so ist die Ge-sellschaft gegebenenfalls wieder zu deregistrie-ren bzw. zu liquidieren. Dieser Vorgang ist et-was umfangreicher und zeitintensiver als die Gründung einer Gesellschaft. Normalerweise dauert die Liquidation einer (relativ kleinen) Hongkong Gesellschaft ca. 6 Monate. Die Li-quidation wird durch Gesellschafterbeschluss eingeleitet, wobei das Board of Directors abbe-rufen und ein Liquidator bestellt wird. Dieser hat die Aufgabe, sämtliche Geschäfte der Ge-

 

 

sellschaft abzuwickeln, worunter auch die Be-gleichung von noch ausstehenden Verbind-lichkeiten und das Eintreiben noch aus-stehender Forderungen fallen. Als nächstes hat der Liquidator beim Handelsregister und bei den Hongkonger Finanzbehörden eine Schlussbilanz einzureichen und noch eventuell ausstehende Steuerverbindlichkeiten zu beglei-chen. Sind sämtliche Verbindlichkeiten begli-chen, kann noch verbleibendes Eigenkapital der Gesellschaft an die Gesellschafter ausge-schüttet werden. Hiernach teilt der Liquidator dem Handelsregister die Beendigung der Li-quidation mit und die Gesellschaft wird drei Monate später aus dem Handelsregister ge-löscht.

 

  1. Steuerliche Behandlung

 

Die Steuerpflicht einer Hongkong Gesellschaft ergibt sich aus Section 12 (1) Chapter 112 In-land Revenue Ordinance.

 

„(1) …profits tax shall be charged for each year of as-sessment at the standard rate on every person carrying on a trade, profession or business in Hong Kong in re-spect of his assessable profits arising in or derived from Hong Kong for that year from such trade, profession or business …”

 

Für Gewinne, die durch eine gewerbliche Tä-tigkeit erzielt werden, wird eine sog. Ge-winnsteuer („Profits Tax“) erhoben. Nach dem Territorialprinzip sind dabei nur Gewinne einer Kapitalgesellschaft in Hongkong steuerpflich-tig, soweit sie in Hongkong erwirtschaftet wurden (On Shore Profit). Gewinne sind dann in Hongkong erzielt, wenn folgende drei Voraussetzungen erfüllt werden.

 

  • Der Steuerpflichtige übt eine Tätigkeit in Hongkong aus.

 

  • Die Gewinne stammen aus der ausgeüb-ten Tätigkeit.

 

  • Die Gewinne stammen aus Hongkong.

 

Angenommen, die ausländische Gesellschaft beteiligt sich an einem Projekt in Hongkong, so kann davon ausgegangen werden, dass sämt-liche Gewinne in Hongkong steuerpflichtig sind. Werden die erwirtschafteten Gewinne dann in Form von Dividende an die Mutterge-sellschaft in Europa ausgeschüttet, so ist diese Ausschüttung in Hongkong quellensteuerfrei, in Deutschland gilt im Wesentlichen das Be-triebsausgabenabzugsverbot des § 8b Abs. 5 KStG, so dass die Dividenden lediglich zu ca. 2% zu versteuern sind.

 

Eine Hongkong Ltd. ist buchführungspflichtig und hat jährlich eine Bilanz abzugeben, die von einem zertifizierten Wirtschaftsprüfer bestätigt werden muss. Der Steuersatz für Kapitalgesell-schaften beträgt 16,5%. Es gibt eine Vielzahl von Dienstleistungsgesellschaften, die gegen angemessene Entlohnung die Buchführung und den Jahresabschluss übernehmen; wenn gewünscht kann aber auch eine der „Big Four“ Gesellschaften beauftragt werden.

 

  1. Zusammenfassung

 

Aus Sicht des Gesellschaftsrechts ist eine Hongkong Gesellschaft eine juristische Person ähnlich der deutschen GmbH. Steuerrechtlich gesehen ist sie ein Steuersubjekt. Hier besteht kein Problem mit der Doppelbesteuerung, da die Hongkong Gesellschaft keinen Sitz in Deutschland hat und folglich in Deutschland nicht steuerpflichtig ist.

 

III. Gründung von Joint Ventures

 

Wie bereits angesprochen, kann die Tätigkeit in Hongkong auch in Zusammenarbeit mit einer lokalen Gesellschaft in Form eines JV stattfin-den.

 

  1. Incorporated JV

 

Ein Incorporated JV (oder auch Equity JV) ist ein Zusammenschluss von mindestens zwei Partnern, mit dem diese eine neue juristische Person, das Joint Venture, gründen. Regelun-gen zwischen den Vertragspartnern und Ge-sellschaftern, wie zum Beispiel Beteiligungs-verhältnisse, Gewinn- und Verlustverteilung, Stimmrechte, Besetzung der verschiedenen Po-sitionen, können in Hongkong durch Gesell-schaftervertrag (Shareholders’ Agreement) zwi-schen den JV Partnern frei vereinbart werden.

 

 

Nach Eintragung des JV ins Handelsregister und Registrierung mit den Steuerbehörden ist das JV eine Hongkonger Gesellschaft und die Gesellschaft an sich aber auch die Gesellschaf-ter unterliegen Hongkonger Recht.

 

Die Haftung der Gesellschafter (JV Partner) richtet sich nach Hongkonger Gesellschafts-recht, so dass eine Haftung der Gesellschafter grundsätzlich nicht in Betracht kommt, wenn diese ihre Stammeinlage auf das Stammkapital voll geleistet haben. Gewinn, welchen das JV erwirtschaftet, kann als Dividende an die JV Partner ausgeschüttet werden. Wie die Partner am Gewinn beteiligt sind, können diese im Ge-sellschaftsvertrag grundsätzlich frei regeln, all-gemein wird aber der Gewinn im Verhältnis der Beteiligungsquote (z.B.: 50:50 oder 70:30) ausgeschüttet. Dasselbe gilt für die Stimmver-hältnisse; grundsätzlich sollten die Stimmver-hältnisse auch den Beteiligungsverhältnissen entsprechen, so dass der stärkere JV Partner (der auch mehr investiert) auch über die Beset-zung von Positionen und/oder wichtige Ge-schäftsentscheidungen bestimmen kann.

 

  1. Contractual JV

 

Auch bei einem Contractual JV schließen die JV Partner untereinander einen JV Vertrag. In diesem verpflichten diese sich aber nicht zur Errichtung einer neuen Gesellschaft, sondern die Partner verpflichten sich zur Erbringung von Leistungen zur Erreichung eines gemeinsa-men Zwecks: Partner 1 verpflichtet sich z.B. zur Herstellung von Beton, Partner 2 verpflichtet sich, diesen Beton zum Brückenbau (dem gemeinsamen Zweck) zu verwenden. Im Gegensatz zum Incorporated JV entsteht bei einem Contractual JV keine neue juristische Person, sondern sämtliche Rechte und Pflichten verbleiben bei den JV Partnern, die demgemäß auch direkt und unmittelbar für Ansprüche gegen das JV verantwortlich sind und haftbar bleiben. Im deutschen sind solche JV Zusammenschlüsse auch unter dem Namen „Arbeitsgemeinschaft“ oder ARGE bekannt und kommen vor allem bei Großprojekten wie Tunnel- oder Straßenbauprojekten vor.

 

In Hongkong müssen Contractual JVs beim Handelsregister angemeldet werden und es muss eine ladungsfähige Anschrift in Hong-kong sowie ein Ansprechpartner in Hongkong genannt werden. Dies verursacht in der Regel keine praktischen Schwierigkeiten, da eine Viel-zahl von Dienstleistern ihre Adresse und auch den Ansprechpartner gegen recht geringe Ge-bühren zur Verfügung stellen.

 

Da bei einem Contractual JV keine eigene juris-tische Person entsteht, sind die JV Partner in Hongkong steuerpflichtig, wenn das Projekt Gewinn erwirtschaftet und dieser nach den all-gemeinen steuerlichen Regeln in Hongkong steuerpflichtig ist, was der Fall sein wird, da bei einem Projekt in Hongkong der Gewinn unter die Definition: „…arising in or derived from Hong Kong“ fallen wird. Damit hat jeder JV Partner (also z.B. eine deutsche GmbH) in Hongkong eine Steuererklärung abzugeben und den Ge-winn in Hongkong zu versteuern. In Deutsch-land können dann die in Hongkong bereits ge-zahlten Steuern nach § 26 Abs. 1, 2 KStG

 

i.V.m. § 34c EstG angerechnet werden. Unter Umständen wäre es aus steuerrechtlicher Sicht günstiger, nicht eine deutsche Gesellschaft, sondern eine österreichische, luxemburger oder schweizer Gesellschaft als JV Partner zu nutzen, da diese Länder (und auch eine Vielzahl weiterer Länder) über ein Doppelbesteuerungsabkommen mit Hongkong verfügen, das eine steuerlich günstigere Behandlung möglich macht (ggf. wird in 2015 das DBA zwischen Deutschland und Hongkong in Kraft treten).

 

  1. Betriebsstätte

 

Es ist auch möglich, dass ein deutsches Unter-nehmen keine eigene Tochtergesellschaft grün-det, sondern für die Zeit der Tätigkeit in Hong-kong nur eine Betriebsstätte in Hongkong an-meldet.

 

 

  1. Anmeldung

 

Zu Beginn der Geschäftstätigkeit (d.h. sofort nach oder noch vor Aufnahme der Tätigkeit) hat die Gesellschaft die Betriebsstätte beim Handelsregister anzumelden. Dabei müssen die deutsche Adresse des Mutterhauses und die Hongkonger Adresse der Betriebsstätte ange-geben und ein Vertreter der Gesellschaft in Hongkong benannt werden. Darüber hinaus sind die deutschen Gesellschafter und Ge-schäftsführer anzugeben sowie ein deutscher Handelsregisterauszug als Existenznachweis der Gesellschaft (übersetzt ins Englische) vor-zulegen. Weiterhin ist der deutsche Gesell-schaftsvertrag bei der Anmeldung in Hong-kong (übersetzt) einzureichen. Aufgrund der Notwendigkeit der Einreichung von übersetz-ten Dokumenten kann sich die Anmeldung ei-ner Betriebsstätte über einige Wochen hinziehen und ist damit weitaus zeit- und kostenintensiver als die Gründung einer eigenen Gesellschaft.

 

Weiterhin kann ein erhebliches Haftungsprob-lem bei Betriebsstätten bestehen, da diese keine eigene juristische Personen sind und daher nicht selbst haften (wie eine Ltd. oder GmbH), sondern Teil der deutschen Muttergesellschaft sind. Damit haftet direkt die deutsche Muttergesellschaft, sofern bei der Tätigkeit der Betriebsstätte in Hongkong ein haf-tungsrelevanter Tatbestand verwirklicht wird.

 

  1. Steuerliche Behandlung

 

Eine ausländische Betriebsstätte ist beim Fi-nanzamt anzumelden und muss jährlich eine Bilanz erstellen, prüfen lassen und einreichen. Die Betriebsstätte hat innerhalb von vier Mo-naten nach Ablauf des Veranlagungszeitraums die Steuererklärung abzugeben, auch wenn das Hongkonger Finanzamt die Abgabe nicht ex-plizit anfordert.

 

  1. Problem der Doppelbesteuerung

 

Bei der Errichtung einer Betriebsstätte können teilweise Kosten des Mutterhauses als Kosten der Betriebsstätte in Abzug gebracht werden, allerdings ist die Abgrenzung nicht immer ein-fach.

 

Da eine Betriebsstätte in Hongkong steuer-pflichtig ist, kann dies zu praktischen Proble-men führen, da die Ermittlung des Be-triebsergebnisses für jede Betriebsstätte separat durchgeführt werden muss, da die Betriebs-stätte keine eigene juristische Person, sondern Teil der deutschen Gesellschaft ist. Eine ge-naue Abgrenzung ist daher nicht möglich, son-dern es muss geschätzt werden, welche Kosten und Erträge der Betriebsstätte zuzurechnen sind. Dies trägt das inhärente Risiko der Dop-pelbesteuerung, da Hongkonger und deutsche Finanzbehörden nicht an das Urteil der jeweils anderen Seite gebunden sind und so jede Fi-nanzbehörde frei festlegen kann, welche Be-träge wie zuzuordnen sind.

 

Insbesondere aus steuerrechtlicher Sicht ist deshalb zu empfehlen, keine Betriebsstätte, sondern eine Tochtergesellschaft in Hongkong zu gründen, um so das Problem der Doppelbe-steuerung zu vermeiden. Die Tochtergesell-schaft ist ein selbständiges Steuersubjekt und daher in Deutschland nicht steuerpflichtig. An-gesichts des relativ niedrigen Steuersatzes ist eine Steuerentlastung um bis zu 30% möglich.

 

  1. Arbeitsrecht

 

Jeder Ausländer, der in Hongkong einer Tätig-keit nachgeht, benötigt hierfür ab dem ersten Tag ein Arbeits- (Employment-) Visum, unab-hängig von der Beschäftigungsdauer und unab-hängig davon ob er eine Vergütung erhält. Die Beantragung eines Arbeitsvisums wird normalerweise vom Arbeitgeber vorgenom-men, der entweder eine Hongkonger Gesell-schaft oder zumindest in Hongkong registriert sein muss. Somit kann sowohl die eigene Hongkong Gesellschaft als auch eine Betriebs-stätte ein Visum beantragen und als „Sponsor“ fungieren. Hierfür sind neben Dokumenten des Arbeitnehmers (Lebenslauf, Zeugnisse, Nachweis über besondere Fertigkeiten) auch Dokumente des Arbeitgebers einzureichen, un-ter anderem ein Handelsregisterauszug, eine Bi-lanz und ein Business-Plan. Sämtliche Unterla-gen, die nicht auf englisch oder chinesisch sind, sind zu übersetzen.

 

 

Besteht zum Zeitpunkt der Antragstellung we-der eine Gesellschaft noch eine Betriebsstätte, so kann auch ein Hongkonger Geschäftspart-ner das Visum beantragen und als Sponsor fungieren. Dies wird aber von Hongkonger Unternehmen meist aus Zeit- und Kostengrün-den abgelehnt, so dass vorab zu klären ist, wer für die Beantragung des Visums zuständig sein soll und wer die Kosten dafür trägt.

 

Ist dies geklärt, dauert es, wenn alle Unterlagen vollständig eingereicht sind, in der Regel 4 bis 6 Wochen bis ein Visum erteilt wird. Dieses ist grundsätzlich ein Jahr gültig, es sei denn, es wird bei der Beantragung angegeben, dass die Beschäftigung weniger als ein Jahr dauert.

 

  1. Verschiedenes

 

  1. Im- und Export

 

Hongkong ist ein Freihafen und für Import und Export werden grundsätzlich keine Zölle erhoben. Die Zollpflicht besteht nur für Spiri-tuosen, Tabak, Mineralöl und Methylalkohol.

 

Es müssen aber beim Import und Export von sämtlichen Waren und Gütern Zolldeklaratio-nen abgegeben werden. Dies ist recht problem-los unter Angabe der Art der Waren (gegliedert in Kategorien) möglich. Die Kosten belaufen sich auf lediglich 0,5% des Warenwerts.

 

  1. Eigentumsvorbehalt

 

Auch in Hongkong gibt es die Möglichkeit bei Kaufverträgen einen Eigentumsvorbehalt zu vereinbaren. Allerdings spielt dieser eher eine untergeordnete Rolle, da nach Common Law (das in Hongkong gilt) Eigentum kein stärkeres Recht darstellt als der schuldrechtliche An-spruch eines Verkäufers auf Zahlung. Daher kommt dem Eigentumsvorbehalt in Hong Kong nur dann Bedeutung zu, wenn der Käu-fer nicht mehr zahlen kann, also insolvent ist. In einem solchen Fall steht dem Verkäufer für Ware, die unter Eigentumsvorbehalt verkauft wurde, ein Aussonderungsrecht zu, d.h. die Ware fällt nicht in die Insolvenzmasse. Grund-sätzlich geht das Eigentum beim Spezieskauf nach Hongkonger Recht bereits mit dem Abschluss des Kaufvertrages auf den Käufer über (Section 20 Rule 1. Sale of Goods Ordinance, Chapter 26), wenn im Kaufvertrag nichts an-deres vereinbart ist. Beim Kauf von Waren, die noch zu konkretisieren sind, geht das Eigentum mit der Durchführung der Konkre-tisierungshandlung durch den Verkäufer auf den Käufer über (Section 20 Rule 2. – Rule 3, Sale of Goods Ordinance). Nach der ge-setzlichen Regelung geht das Eigentum unab-hängig von der vollständigen Bezahlung des Kaufpreises über.

 

Section 21 Sale of Goods Ordinance ermög-licht es aber, eine Eigentumsvorbehaltsklausel in den Vertrag einzufügen. Danach kann ver-einbart werden, dass das Eigentum erst über-gehen soll, wenn eine bestimmte Bedingung (Zahlung) erfüllt ist. Die Bedingung muss ein-deutig formuliert sein. Z. B. die gängige Be-zeichnung „C.O.D.“ (cash on delivery) reicht als eine Eigentumsvorbehaltsklausel aus, ist aber nicht notwendig. Entscheidend ist, dass die Bezahlung des Kaufpreises als eine Bedin-gung für den Eigentumsübergang von beiden Parteien gewollt ist. Darüber hinaus gibt es auch noch die Möglichkeit einen verlängerten bzw. einen erweiterten Eigentumsvorbehalt zu vereinbaren. Allerdings müssen solche Klau-seln sehr genau und spezifisch formuliert werden, da jede Ungenauigkeit zulasten des Ver-käufers geht, mit der Gefahr, dass die Klausel als unwirksam angesehen wird, der Verkäufer das Eigentum verliert und kein Geld erhält.

 

VII. Zusammenfassung

 

Bei kurzfristigen Tätigkeiten kommt sowohl die Gründung einer eigenen Hongkong Gesell-schaft, als auch die Anmeldung einer Betriebs-stätte in Betracht. Allerdings hat die Gründung einer Hongkong Gesellschaft einige Vorteile, weil dies meist schneller von statten geht als die Anmeldung einer Betriebsstätte und vor al-lem aber haftungsrechtliche Vorteile hat, da durch eine eigene Gesellschaft in Hongkong eine Abschirmwirkung für die deutsche Mut-tergesellschaft eintritt. Weiterhin kann durch eine eigene Gesellschaft das Problem der Doppelbesteuerung umgangen werden.

 

Nichtsdestotrotz hängt die Entscheidung, wie das Geschäftsmodell in Hongkong aussehen soll immer vom konkreten Einzelfall ab, so dass hier keine Pauschalempfehlung gegeben werden kann. Es ist immer eine vollumfängli-che gesellschafts- und steuerrechtliche Analyse notwendig, bei der auch die Belange des Mut-terhauses zu berücksichtigen sind.

 

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 141 (EN)


 

 

 

 

 

 

Short Term Business Activity in Hong Kong A Legal, Tax & Administration Guide

 

February 2015

 

 

 

 

All rights reserved  Lorenz & Partners 2015

 

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information provided. None of the infor-mation contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims re – garding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is in-complete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

 

Hong Kong is one of the few countries in the world which generates a budget surplus every year. The surplus for the 2013/2014 fiscal year is an estimated EUR 6.5 billion. In recent years, the Hong Kong government has tended to invest a significant part of this surplus into very large infrastructure projects, such as the expansion of the mass transit railway (“MTR”), the express train line to Shenzhen and Guangzhou and the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge (due to be completed in 2016). As many local contractors are too small to meet the demands of such large projects, an in-creasing number of tenders have been submit-ted, and won, by foreign companies.

 

This newsletter has been drafted to give an overview of how a foreign company can con-duct business in Hong Kong, particularly in re-gards to short term projects. This overview will include a review of the relevant labour, com-pany and tax law.

 

Foreign companies can conduct business in Hong Kong as follows:

 

  • Set up a Hong Kong company as a sub-sidiary or a sister company of the foreign company.

 

  • Register a permanent establishment of the foreign company in Hong Kong.

 

  • Set up a Joint Venture (“JV”) with a local partner-enterprise. There are two types of JV in Hong Kong:

 

  • Incorporated (or Equity) JV, whereby the JV is registered in the Hong Kong Companies Registry and a new corpo-rate body is created.

 

  • Contractual JV, whereby the co-operation between the parties is based on a contract without any registration. No new corporate body is created and the rights and liabilities of each JV partner remain separate.

 

  • Set up of a Hong Kong company

 

  1. Set up of a Hong Kong company

 

The most popular corporate format in Hong Kong is a limited liability company. The setup costs are low and the procedure can be com-pleted quickly. One director and one share-holder are required and both positions can be filled by the same person (natural person or corporate body). According to the new Companies Ordinance every limited liability company must have at least one natural person as director. A company secretary is also re-quired. If the company has multiple directors then one of these can also act as the company secretary. However, the company secretary cannot be the same person as the company’s sole director.

 

The company can be registered via a postbox address, an actual physical office is not neces-sary. There is no minimum capital amount (theoretical 1 HKD possible, approx. 10 US cent) and there is no duty to pay up the share capital. Consequently, interest will not apply to non paid-up share capital. However, the shareholders are personally liable as debtors of the company for any unpaid amount.

 

The Articles of Association should be signed by all shareholders and submitted with the registration. Most Hong Kong companies use standard articles. A certification/notarization of the Articles of Association or of the signa-tures is not required. The full registration process – from delivery of the documents to entry in the registry – takes four to seven workdays. The opening of a local bank account takes approx. seven workdays, if all documents are submitted properly.

 

German readers should note that according to § 138 Abs. 2 Nr. 1 AO the setup of a new company overseas must be reported to the fi-nance authority.

 

  • Liquidation of a Hong Kong company

 

If a Hong Kong company has completed its project, it may be wound up and liquidated. This procedure is extensive and takes substan-tially longer than the original set up. For exam-ple, the liquidation of a small company usually takes 6 months. Liquidation is initiated by a shareholders’ resolution. The Board of Direc-tors is then recalled and a liquidator is ap-pointed. The liquidator has all the powers and rights necessary to conduct the whole business of the company, including clearing and collecting debts.

 

The next step is for the liquidator to submit a closing balance sheet to the Companies Regis-try and the Inland Revenue Department and to pay all outstanding tax debts. All the compa-ny’s other debts are then paid and any re-maining capital is distributed to the sharehold-ers. The liquidator reports the ending of the liquidation to the Companies Registry and the company will be deleted from the Companies Registry within 3 months.

 

  1. Tax law treatment


 

Profit). Profits are deemed to be generated in Hong Kong when the following 3 re-quirements are fulfilled:

 

  • The tax payer undertakes business in Hong Kong.

 

  • The profits arise from this business.

 

  • The profits are generated in Hong Kong.

 

Assuming that the foreign company joins a Hong Kong project, then all profits resulting from this project are taxable in Hong Kong. However, if the profits are distributed to the European parent company, then they may be tax free in the foreign country too (e.g. Ger-many: non-deductibility of operating costs ac-cording to § 8b Abs. 5 KStG). The standard

 

“Profits Tax” rate is 16.5%.

 

A Hong Kong company is legally obligated to keep books and to submit an annual balance sheet which is confirmed by a certified auditor. Hong Kong has a number of service compa-nies (including the “Big Four”) that will keep these books on the company’s behalf in ex-change for a reasonable fee.

 

  1. Summary

 

A Hong Kong company is a corporation entity which is similar to a German GmbH. It is a tax subject. A double taxation problem will not arise so long as the Hong Kong company does not have a registered office in Germany.

 

 

A Hong Kong company’s tax liability is based on Section 12 (1) Chapter 112 Inland Revenue Ordinance.

 

„(1) …profits tax shall be charged for each year of as-sessment at the standard rate on every person carrying on a trade, profession or business in Hong Kong in re-spect of his assessable profits arising in or derived from Hong Kong for that year from such trade, profession or business …”

 

For profits realised by commercial activities a “Profits Tax” is levied. According to the terri-torial principle, profits are only taxable when they are generated in Hong Kong (On Shore

 

III. Set up of Joint Ventures

 

As noted above, business activities can be con-ducted in Hong Kong in co-operation with other companies via a JV.

 

  1. Incorporated JV

 

An Incorporated JV (or Equity JV) is where at least two partners agree to set up a new corpo-ration entity, the Joint Venture. Issues such as ownership structure, profit and loss sharing, rights to vote and occupation of the positions etc can be negotiated freely between the part-ners/shareholders and then confirmed in writing via a Shareholder or Joint Venture Agree-ment.

 

Once the JV has been registered in the Compa-nies Registry and at the Inland Revenue De-partment, it is a legally accepted Hong Kong company and it is treated the same as any other company. The company and the shareholders are subject to Hong Kong law.

 

All the JV partners will have limited liability like any other shareholder so long as their capi-tal has been fully paid up. Profits generated by the JV can be distributed to JV partners as divi-dends. The partners are free to determine the profit participation in the Articles of Associ-ation. Usually, but not always, the profit participation will reflect partners’ share ratio. The same applies to voting rights; thus the JV partner who invests the most can control who is appointed as a director etc and how key deci-sions are made.

 

  1. Contractual JV

 

A Contractual JV is where the JV partners en-ter a contract to cooperate with one another for a stated purpose. No new company is es-tablished. For example, Partner 1 promises to produce cement, Partner 2 promises to use the cement for the agreed purpose of building a new bridge. As no new corporation entity has been created, the parties under a contractual JV are directly responsible and liable for the debts and other liabilities of the JV. In Germany such JVs are called “Arbeitsgemeinschaft ” or ARGE. Normally ARGEs are used for mega projects like tunnels or road works.

 

In Hong Kong Contractual JVs must be regis-tered with the Companies Registry. A contact address and person within Hong Kong must also be determined. As many local agency companies provide their address and a contact person for a small payment, this requirement is not a real problem. Each partner to a Contrac-tual JV is individually liable for their own tax if the project generates profits that are taxable ac-cording to Hong Kong tax regulations. Conse-quently, JV partners (for example a German

 

 

GmbH) have to submit a tax declaration and pay Profit Tax (if applicable) in Hong Kong. In Germany the tax which has been paid in Hong Kong can be credited against the partner’s

German tax liability under § 26 Abs. 1, 2 KStG and § 34c EStG. However, investors should consider if it would be advantageous to create a JV with a company from Austria, Luxembourg or Switzerland rather than from Germany since such countries have full double taxation agreements with Hong Kong (Germany may have one in 2015).

 

  1. Permanent Establishment

 

It is also possible for a foreign enterprise to conduct business in Hong Kong via a branch rather than a new legal entity, since the branch is regarded as part of the mother company.

 

  1. Registration

 

At the start of operations (i.e. immediately after or before starting work) the company has to register the branch with the Companies Regis-try. The foreign address of the parent company and the Hong Kong address of the branch must be announced and a representative of the company in Hong Kong must be named. Further, all directors and shareholders must be announced and an excerpt from the (German) commercial register must be obtained as proof of its valid existence. Moreover the company’s (German) Articles of Association (translated) must be submitted to the Company Registry. As all the aforementioned (German) documents must be translated, the whole registration process can take several weeks, i.e. much longer than the set up process.

 

Finally, it should be noted that since branches are not corporation entities, they cannot be held directly liable for their actions and debts (like a Ltd. or GmbH). Instead the parent com-pany will be held liable.

 

  1. Tax law treatment

 

The branch should be registered with the In-land Revenue Department and must submit an audited balance sheet annually within 4 months after the tax assessment period has expired, even if the Inland Revenue Department does not explicitly request such a submission.

 

  1. Problem of the double taxation

 

Expenses of the branch can be partly deducted as expenses of the parent company. However, the distinction is far from clear, and might cause more work than it brings benefits.

 

A branch in Hong Kong is tax liable. This cre-ates problems, since profits must be ascertained separately for each branch. As an exact distinction is not possible, it has to be estimated which costs and income are apportioned by the branch and which are appropriated by the parent company. This bears the inherent risk of double taxation as the Hong Kong Inland Revenue Department and the foreign tax authorities are not bound by each other’s judgments. Tax authorities on each side can decide freely on how much tax should be paid even if contradictions and double taxation are the result.

 

Therefore in order to avoid double taxation it is usually better to set up a company rather than a branch in Hong Kong. The company is then an independent tax subject and conse-quently is not liable for tax abroad. Consider-ing Hong Kong’s relatively low tax rate, a tax saving of up to 30% is possible.

 

  1. Labour law

 

Every foreigner working in Hong Kong needs an Employment Visa from the first working day, no matter how long the working period and how much the remuneration is. The Employment Visa application is usually submitted by the employer (the “sponsor”) who must be either a Hong Kong company or a natural person registered in Hong Kong. Thus both a Hong Kong subsidiary company and a branch can act as a sponsor. Certain employee documents (curriculum vitae, certificates and proof of special skills) must be submitted along with an excerpt from the Companies Registry, balance sheet, business

 

 

plan etc. All documents which are not in the Chinese or English language need be translated. If at the time of application the employer has not yet established a company or a branch then a Hong Kong business partner can submit the visa application and act as the sponsor. However, for time and cost reasons many local partners are unwilling to provide such assistance. Therefore, investors are ad-vised to clarify in advance who must apply for such visas and who must bear the costs.

 

Once all the documents are submitted, the visa will be issued within 4 to 6 weeks. Most visas are valid for one year, although longer and shorter periods are possible

 

  1. Miscellaneous

 

  1. Import and export

 

Hong Kong is a free harbour and on the whole does not levy any customs tariffs on imports and exports. Only 4 types of commodities are dutiable: Liquor, Tobacco, Hydrocarbon Oil and Methyl Alcohol.

 

An import/export declaration will be required for the transported goods and wares. The dec-laration procedure is straight forward and just involves stating the type of goods (listed in cat-egories). The declaration costs amount to sim-ply 0.5% of the goods’ value.

 

  1. Retention of title

 

In theory, Hong Kong allows for retention of title clauses to be included in commercial con-tracts. However in practice such clauses are not popular because of the common law tradition that the seller’s right to payment does not out-rank the purchaser’s right to the property.

 

Under retention of title clauses if a purchaser is unable to pay the amount owed (i.e. they are insolvent) the seller will be entitled to repossess the goods to the exclusion of other creditors. However, under the law, where the sale is for specific goods which are already in a “deliver-able state” the property in the goods passes to the buyer when the contract is made, unless a different intention appears (Section 20 Rule 1 Sale of Goods Ordinance, Chapter 26). For the sale of specific goods where the seller must do something to the goods to put them into a de-liverable state, the property passes to the buyer when such task is completed (Section 20 Rule 2 – Rule 3, Sale of Goods Ordinance). Thus, ac-cording to the above mentioned rules, the property passes regardless of whether total payment has been made or not.

 

However, under Section 21 Sale of Goods Or-dinance where the contract has a retention of title clause it can be considered that the prop-erty passes only upon a specific condition be-ing fulfilled (i.e. payment). The condition must be formulated precisely. Further, the condition must be agreed and intended by both parties. Retention of title clauses for produced or man-ufactured goods or “all liabilities” clauses are also possible. Such clauses must be formulated exactly and specifically, as any inaccuracy will be decided in favour of the purchaser. In most cases this means that the clause will be invalid, thus the seller will lose the property in the goods even if there is no payment received from the buyer.

 

VII. Conclusion

 

A company which wishes to conduct short term business activities in Hong Kong can ei-ther set up a new legal entity (Co. Ltd. or JV) or establishment branch office. In most cases the foundation of a Hong Kong company will be preferable as only this format can be used to avoid double taxation.

 

However, which business model is the best op-tion will ultimately depend on the circum-stances of each case. There is no general rec-ommendation. A complete analysis regarding company and tax law is always required which includes a consideration of the interests of the parent company.

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 142 (DE)


 

 

 

 

 

 

Schlichtung von Steuerstreitigkeiten in Hongkong

 

 

 

Februar 2015

 

 

 

 

All rights reserved ã Lorenz & Partners 2015

 

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners (Hong Kong) Ltd. größtmögliche Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesem Newsletter bereitgestellten Informationen stets auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass dieser eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen kann. Lorenz & Partners Ltd. übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit, Vollständigkeit der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners Ltd., welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informatio-nen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners (Hong Kong) Ltd. kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

 

  1. Einführung

 

Hongkong stellt eines der Länder mit den welt-weit niedrigsten Steuersätzen dar. Steuern wer-den nur auf wenige Einkunftsarten wie

 

  • Unternehmensgewinne

 

  • Gehälter

 

  • Mieteinkünfte

 

erhoben. Andere Steuern, wie zum Beispiel die Erbschaft- oder Alkoholsteuer, wurden in den letzten Jahren abgeschafft. Haupteinnahme-quelle der Hongkonger Regierung ist vor allem die Steuer auf Unternehmensgewinne („Profits Tax“). Weniger ins Gewicht fallen die anderen beiden Steuerarten, da lediglich 10% der Hongkonger Einwohner überhaupt Steuern zahlen. Darüber hinaus gewährt die Hongkon-ger Regierung aufgrund ihres Überschusses, der regelmäßig erwirtschaftet wird, großzügige Steuernachlässe und Erleichterungen.

 

Auch der Steuersatz an sich ist recht niedrig, er liegt für Unternehmen bei 16,5% und ist bei der Einkommensteuer gestaffelt von 2% – 17,5%, der Maximalsteuersatz ist aber 15%.

 

Darüber hinaus besteht noch die Möglichkeit, bestimmte Unternehmensgewinne in Hong-kong herauszunehmen, da nur solche Gewinne in Hongkong zu versteuern sind, die in Hong-kong erwirtschaftet wurden (Onshore Ge-winne). Gewinne, die außerhalb Hongkongs erwirtschaftet wurden (Offshore Gewinne), sind in Hongkong grundsätzlich steuerfrei.

 

 

  1. Aufbau des Finanzwesens

 

Verantwortlich für die Erhebung von Steuern in Hongkong ist das Inland Revenue Depart-ment (IRD). Rechtsgrundlage ist das Hong-konger Steuergesetz, die Inland Revenue Ordi-nance (IRO).

 

Zum Ende des Finanzjahrs am 31. März sendet das IRD an sämtliche Unternehmen und steu-erpflichtige Personen einen Vordruck zur Steu-ererklärung (dieser umfasst ca. drei Seiten), den der Steuerpflichtige innerhalb von einem Mo-nat mit Angaben über Einkommen, geltend gemachte Freibeträge und sonstigen Angaben zurückzusenden hat. Aufgrund dieser Angaben erlässt das IRD im August einen Steuerbe-scheid (umfasst zwei Seiten), aus dem sich das zu versteuernde Einkommen, die Abzüge und die zu zahlende Steuer ergibt. Der Steuerpflich-tige hat dann die Möglichkeit, die Steuer in zwei Raten (Ende Dezember und Anfang März des Folgejahres) zu begleichen. Eine monatli-che Lohnsteuerabführung erfolgt dementspre-chend nicht.

 

Ist das IRD mit den Angaben in der Steuerer-klärung nicht einverstanden, oder möchte der Steuerpflichtige gegen die Festsetzung in der Steuererklärung vorgehen, so steht ihm folgen-der Instanzenweg offen:

 

  • Diskussion mit dem zuständigen Bear-beiter

 

  • Weiterreichen des Falles an die „Appeals

 

Section“

  • Board of Review

 

  • Court of First Instance


 

 

 

ã Lorenz & Partners

Februar 2015

Seite: 2 von 5

 

E-Mail: [email protected]

 

 

 

 

L&P

Newsletter Nr. 142 (DE)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

  • Court of Appeal

 

  • Court of Final Appeal

 

III. Erste Stufe: IRD

 

Sollten in der Steuererklärung Ungereimtheiten auftauchen, so wird das IRD dem Steuer-pflichtigen ein mehr oder weniger aus-führliches Anschreiben senden, in dem dieser zur Stellungnahme der offenen Fragen inner-halb von zwei Monaten aufgefordert wird. Zu beachten ist, dass das IRD das Recht hat, Steu-erbescheide bis zu sechs Jahre nachträglich zu ändern. Dies hat zur Folge, dass nicht jedes Jahr der Steuerbescheid überprüft wird, son-dern eine genauere Prüfung nur alle vier bis fünf Jahre stattfindet. So kann es sein, dass der Steuerpflichtige auch zu Sachverhalten aus der Vergangenheit Stellung beziehen muss, was mitunter schwierig sein kann, da Unterlagen schwer zu finden sind, Mitarbeiter gewechselt haben, etc.

 

Nach Erhalt der Stellungnahme erlässt das IRD einen Steuerbescheid, was ca. weitere vier bis fünf Monate in Anspruch nimmt. Ist der Steuerpflichtige mit diesem Bescheid nicht ein-verstanden, hat er innerhalb eines Monats Ein-spruch einzulegen. Währenddessen kann der Steuerpflichtigen auch versuchen, direkt mit dem Bearbeiter beim IRD in Kontakt zu tre-ten, um diesen von einer anderen rechtlichen oder tatsächlichen Lage zu überzeugen. Al-lerdings sollte trotzdem nicht die Frist zum Einspruch versäumt werden, da der Steuerbe-scheid ansonsten rechtskräftig wird.

 

Weiterhin ist zu beachten, dass der Einspruch keine aufschiebende Wirkung hat, so dass die festgesetzte Steuer trotzdem gezahlt werden muss. Für den Fall dass diese später wieder zu-rück erstattet wird, erhält der Steuerpflichtige einen Zins in Höhe von max. 0,1% p.a. der Summe.

 

 

  1. Appeals Section

 

Konnte mit dem Sachbearbeiter keine Eini-gung gefunden werden und wurde fristgemäß Einspruch eingelegt, so wird der Fall der „Ap-peals Section“ des IRD vorgelegt. Diese be-steht aus erfahreneren Steuersachbearbeitern, die sich ausschließlich mit Einsprüchen be-schäftigen.

 

Diese versuchen die Fakten des Falles zu ord-nen und stellen hierzu dem Steuerpflichtigen weitere Fragen per Brief, die dieser zu beant-worten hat. Zu beachten ist hier, dass diese Faktensammlung zur Grundlage des weiteren Prozesses wird. Das heißt Fakten, die der Steu-erpflichtige eingeräumt hat, können in den wei-teren Instanzen gegen ihn verwendet werden, auch wenn diese nicht der Wahrheit ent-sprechen. Sollte der Steuerpflichtige manche entscheidungserheblichen Tatsachen nicht an-gegeben oder falsch angegeben haben, so wird es sehr schwer werden, diese im weiteren Ver-lauf zu ergänzen bzw. zu korrigieren. Aus die-sem Grund sollte spätestens hier ein Fachmann hinzugezogen werden, der auch den weiteren potentiellen Verlauf des Falles berücksichtigt.

 

Daraufhin trifft die „Appeals Section“ über den Steuerbescheid eine der folgenden Ent-scheidungen:

 

  • Aufhebung

 

  • Bestätigung, oder

 

  • Berichtigung (nach unten oder oben)

 

Mit diesem Bescheid verbunden ist dann auch der Rechtsbehelfsbescheid für die Berufung zum „Board of Review“. Da die „Appeals Sec-tion“ strukturell zum IRD gehört, ist es un-wahrscheinlich, dass diese den Bescheid zu Gunsten des Steuerpflichtigen ändert.

 

  1. Board of Review

 

Der Einspruch gegen die Entscheidung der „Appeals Section“ führt zum „Board of Re-view“. Zu beachten ist hier die absolute Berufungsfrist von einem Monat. Diese kann auf Antrag wegen Abwesenheit im Ausland oder Krankheit verlängert werden. Allerdings ist es sehr schwierig, das „Board of Review“ hinter-her, nach Fristablauf, von diesen Fakten zu überzeugen, so dass in jedem Fall ein rechtzei-tiger Antrag auf Fristverlängerung gestellt wer-den sollte.

 

Mit Einlegung der Berufung ist auch eine sub-stantielle Begründung, warum Berufung einge-legt wird, einzureichen; es reicht nicht, sich all-gemein auf Fehler im Bescheid zu berufen, sondern es muss materiell begründet werden, warum die früheren Entscheidungen nicht rechtmäßig sind.

 

Weiterhin ist zu beachten, dass eine Kopie der Berufungsschrift innerhalb der Berufungsfrist dem „Commissioner of Inland Revenue De-partment“ (dem Leiter des IRD) zugestellt werden muss. Folge einer Versäumnis ist die Ablehnung der Berufung.

 

Das „Board of Review“ besteht aus einem Vorsitzenden (Chairman), acht Deputies und 70 normalen Mitgliedern. Das „Board of Re-view“ ist ein unabhängiges Organ und die Mit-glieder sind, ähnlich wie Laienrichter in Deutschland, juristisch nicht vorgebildet, son-dern werden aus der Bevölkerung ausgewählt. Lediglich der Chairman und teilweise die De-puties sind Hongkonger Solicitors oder Bar-risters. Verhandlungen werden unter der Füh-rung des Chairman oder eines Deputies unter Mitwirkung von zwei weiteren Mitgliedern ge-führt. Es handelt sich um ein gerichtsähnliches Verfahren, in dem das IRD auf der einen und der Steuerpflichtige auf der anderen Seite Par-teien des Verfahrens sind. Es besteht kein Ver-tretungszwang für den Steuerpflichtigen (durch Solicitor oder Barrister) und es ist zu beachten, dass die Beweispflicht über die Unrechtmäßig-keit früherer Bescheide alleine dem Steuer-pflichtigen auferlegt ist. Dies heisst, er muss Beweise beibringen und Zeugen benennen, die seine Position stützen. Das IRD als Gegenpar-tei wird sich hauptsächlich auf Bestreiten und

 

 

seine frühere Position beschränken. Hier kommen nun auch die von der IRD zu-sammengestellten Fakten zum Tragen, da es dem Steuerpflichtigen grundsätzlich nicht mög-lich ist, weitere Daten oder Fakten in den Pro-zess einzubringen. Kann der Fall nicht an ei-nem Tag abgeschlossen werden, so hat der Vorsitzende die Möglichkeit, die Verhandlung auf einen späteren Zeitpunkt zu vertagen. Das-selbe ist möglich, wenn doch noch neue Fakten eingeführt werden (was aber relativ schwer ist und vom Board of Review eher selten zugelas-sen wird) und eine der Parteien eine Vertagung beantragt.

 

Allerdings kann es selbst in diesem späten Zeit-punkt noch sinnvoll sein, einen Vergleich mit dem IRD zu schliessen, da sich unter Umstän-den erst jetzt, durch Beweiseinvernahme oder Zeugenvernehmung, die Sachlage anders dar-stellt und eine Partei zum Einlenken bereit ist. Solch eine Einigung (Settlement) benötigt aber die Zustimmung des „Board or Review“.

 

Ist die Verhandlung abgeschlossen, so erlässt das „Board of Review“ eine entsprechende Entscheidung. Diese können lauten:

 

  • Reduzierung des Steuerbescheids

 

  • Erhöhung des Steuerbescheids (Verbö-serung)

 

  • Aufhebung des Steuerbescheids.

 

 

  1. Court of First Instance

 

Ist der Steuerpflichtige mit der Entscheidung des Boards of Review nicht einverstanden, so kann er Revision zum Court of First Instance (CFI) einlegen. Die Frist hierfür beträgt wie-derum einen Monat. Die Revision ist keine Tatsacheninstanz, es findet nur eine rechtliche Überprüfung der Vorinstanz statt. Funktionell zuständig ist der Einzelrichter. Außerdem be-steht Vertretungspflicht durch einen Hong-kong Barrister. Es besteht auch die Möglichkeit, nach der „Ap-peals Section“, anstatt das „Board of Re-view“ direkt den CFI anzurufen (ähnlich einer Sprungrevision). Hierzu muss innerhalb von 21 Tagen nach Berufungseinlegung zum „Board of Review“ ein Antrag an den CFI gestellt wer-den. Allerdings muss die Gegenseite, das IRD, diesem direkten Gang zum CFI zustimmen, ansonsten kann dieser Weg nicht eingeschlagen werden. In den letzten Jahren wurde diese Zu-stimmung aber äußerst selten gegeben. Ob der Weg direkt zum CFI einzuschlagen ist, hängt von den Umständen des Einzelfalles ab. Eine Verhandlung vor einem ordentlichen Gericht hat folgende Vor- und Nachteile:

 

Vorteile

  • Unabhängigkeit

 

  • Formalität

 

  • Kostentragungspflicht des Unterlegenen

 

  • U. schneller, da Überspringen einer In-stanz

 

Nachteile:

  • Vertretungspflicht (höhere Kosten)

 

  • öffentliche Verhandlung („Board of Re-view“ unter Ausschluss der Öffentlich-keit)

 

  • Lange Verfahrensdauer.


 

VII. Zusammenfassung

 

Das Verfahren in Steuersachen ist in Hong-kong stark formalisiert und unabhängig. Aller-dings hat es den großen Nachteil, dass es sehr langwierig ist und bis zu einem finalen Urteil mitunter bis zu 10 Jahre vergehen können. Da der Steuerpflichtige während des Verfahrens die Beweispflicht trägt, läuft er Gefahr, dass er Dokumente, Beweise, Zeugen, Mitarbeiter, etc. nach solch langer Zeit nicht mehr auffinden kann oder Zeugen sich nicht mehr erinnern, was zulasten des Steuerpflichtigen gewertet wird.

 

Weiterhin besteht keine Kostentragungspflicht für die unterlegene Partei, das heißt jede Seite trägt ihre Kosten selbst. Dies kann den mehr-fachen Betrag der Streitigkeit ausmachen, wenn der Steuerpflichtige durch mehrere Instanzen hindurch einen oder mehrere Rechtsanwälte zu zahlen hat. Von daher ist es ratsam, von An-fang an auf eine gütliche Einigung mit dem IRD hinzuwirken und sich so früh wie möglich zu einigen. Da das IRD chronisch unterbesetzt ist, hat auch das IRD ein erhebliches Interesse an einer frühen Einigung.

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 143 (DE)


 

 

 

 

 

 

Rechtsdurchsetzung in Hongkong

 

 

 

Februar 2015

 

 

 

 

 

All rights reserved ã Lorenz & Partners 2015

 

Newsletter Nr. 143 (DE)                   L&P

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

INHALTSVERZEICHNIS

 

  1. Einführung…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3

 

  1. Gerichtsaufbau und Verhandlungen in Hongkong……………………………………………………….. 3

 

  1. Welche Rechte können gerichtlich geltend gemacht werden?………………………………………………. 3
  2. a) Anspruch auf Geldzahlung……………………………………………………………………………………….. 3

 

  1. b) Auskunftsanspruch………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
  2. c) Unterlassungsanspruch…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4

 

  1. Ablauf eines Gerichtsverfahrens…………………………………………………………………………………….. 5
  2. a) Anwaltsschreiben…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5

 

  1. b) Klage…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5
  2. c) Vertretung vor Gericht…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5

 

  1. d) Antrag auf Liquidation…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6

 

  1. Gerichtsaufbau in Hongkong von unten nach oben:…………………………………………………………. 6

 

  1. a) Gerichte…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6
  2. b) Magistrates‘ Courts………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6

 

  1. c) District Courts………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6
  2. d) High Court…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6

 

  1. e) Court of First Instance…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6
  2. f) Court of Appeal………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7

 

  1. g) Court of Final Appeal………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7
  2. h) Privy Council………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7

 

  1. Der Ablauf eines Gerichtsverfahrens………………………………………………………………………………. 7
  2. a) Vorverfahren…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 7

 

  1. b) Einreichung der Klage……………………………………………………………………………………………… 7
  2. c) Antwort des Beklagten……………………………………………………………………………………………… 7

 

  1. d) Versäumnisurteil…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8
  2. e) Widerklage……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8

 

  1. f) Urteil im Schnellverfahren…………………………………………………………………………………………. 8
  2. g) Vorläufiger Zeitplan………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8

 

  1. h) Mediation………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8
  2. i) Aufnahme in die Gerichtsliste……………………………………………………………………………………. 9

 

  1. j) Mündliche Verhandlung……………………………………………………………………………………………. 9
  2. k) Gütliche Einigung……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9

 

  1. Dauer………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 9

 

  1. Kosten………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 10

 

  1. a) Anwaltskosten………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10
  2. b) Gerichtskosten……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 10

 

  1. Vollstreckung…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 10

 

III. Weitere Möglichkeiten zur Streitbeilegung………………………………………………………………… 10

 

  1. Arbitration………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 10

 

  1. Schlichtungsverfahren………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11

 

  1. Zusammenfassung……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners (Hongkong) Ltd. größtmögliche Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesem Newsletter bereitgestellten Informationen stets auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass dieser eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen kann. Lorenz & Partners Ltd. übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit oder Vollständigkeit der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners Ltd., welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nut-zung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners (Hongkong) Ltd. kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

 

  1. Einführung

 

2008 wurde das Rechtssystem von Hongkong von ausländischen Führungskräften zum bes-ten Rechtssystem in Asien gewählt, was als Gipfel einer 200 Jahre andauernden Entwick-lung angesehen werden kann.

 

Während der Kolonialzeit wurden von Groß-britannien in Hongkong das Rechtssystem des Common Law sowie der entsprechende Ge-richtsaufbau eingeführt. Dies bildet den Grundstein für das im Vergleich zu anderen asiatischen Ländern moderne und verlässliche Rechtssystem. Gleichzeitig konnte sich da-durch die ehemals kleine und unbedeutende Insel im südchinesischen Meer zu einer der führenden Finanzmetropolen der Welt entwi-ckeln. Trotz der Rückgabe an China am 01. Juli 1997 behält Hongkong zumindest für die nächsten 50 Jahre seine Unabhängigkeit im Jus-tizwesen.

 

Nichtsdestotrotz hat Hongkong eines der lang-samsten Gerichtsverfahren der modernen Welt. Ferner sind die Kosten für Rechtsbera-tung und Rechtsvertretung erheblich höher als in anderen Jurisdiktionen und erreichen fast Ausmaße wie in den USA. Weiterhin ist es auch nicht ganz korrekt, das Hongkonger Ge-richtssystem als „fair“ zu bezeichnen, da der

 

Gewinner eines Rechtsstreits vom Verlierer nicht die gesamten Kosten ersetzt bekommt. So bekommt der Gewinner selbst im Falle ei-nes vollständigen Obsiegens lediglich 60 % – 75 % der Kosten erstattet. Damit besteht die Möglichkeit, dass der finanziell stärkere den fi-nanziell schwächeren allein aufgrund von Geldmangel ausbooten kann und schließlich (eventuell nach mehreren Instanzen) den Streit gewinnt.

 

 

  1. Gerichtsaufbau und Verhandlungen in Hongkong

 

  1. Welche Rechte können gerichtlich gel-tend gemacht werden?

 

  1. a) Anspruch auf Geldzahlung

 

Jeder dem ein potenzieller Anspruch auf Geld-zahlung gegen einen Schuldner zusteht, kann den Anspruch vor dem zuständigen Gericht geltend machen und einklagen. Darüber hinaus besteht die Möglichkeit, die Liquidation des Schuldners zu betreiben oder den Anspruch über außergerichtliche Streitbeilegungsmetho-den durchzusetzen.

 

  1. b) Auskunftsanspruch

 

Unter Umständen benötigt der Kläger vor der Einreichung der Klage weitere Informationen von dem Beklagten oder einer dritten Person, um seinen Anspruch genau zu betiteln oder so genau zu beziffern, dass die Klage vor Gericht anhängig gemacht werden kann ohne Gefahr zu laufen, als unsubstantiiert abgewiesen zu werden.

 

Das Hongkonger Zivilprozessrecht kennt an sich keinen solchen Auskunftsanspruch. Aller-dings gibt es im Wege der Beweisaufnahme die Möglichkeit, von der anderen Partei (oder auch von einem Dritten) bestimmte Informati-onen einzufordern.

 

(i) Anspruch gegen den Beklagten selbst

 

Um im Wege der Beweisaufnahme einen Aus-kunftsanspruch gegen den Beklagten geltend zu machen, muss der Kläger nachweisen, dass

 

  • er zumindest dem Anschein nach einen Anspruch gegen den Beklagten hat,

 

  • die angeforderten Auskünfte später im Verfahren ohnehin eingeholt werden müss-ten, und

 

  • es nicht unmöglich erscheint, dass die an-geforderten Auskünfte die Urteilsfindung erleichtern.

 

(ii) Anspruch gegen Dritten

 

Ein Anspruch auf Auskunft kann auch gegen einen Dritten, der am Rechtsstreit eigentlich unbeteiligt ist, durchgesetzt werden, wenn

 

  • der Dritte zwar nicht direkt Partei des Rechtsstreits ist, aber doch so involviert ist, dass er Informationen hat, die für die Kla-ge wichtig sind,

 

  • es nicht völlig abwegig erscheint, dass der Dritte die bezeichneten Informationen tat-sächlich besitzt, und

 

  • es gerecht erscheint, diesen Auskunftsan-spruch zuzulassen.

 

Die meisten der aktuell verhandelten Fälle in Bezug auf Auskunftsansprüche vor Hongkon-ger Gerichten betrafen vor allem Auskünfte in Bezug auf falsche Behauptungen auf Internet-seiten. Hierzu mussten die Kläger darlegen, dass Ihnen zumindest dem ersten Anschein nach (prima facie) ein Anspruch gegen den Be-klagten zusteht und sie mussten darlegen, dass die Information, die sie von den Betreibern der Internetseite benötigten (meistens die wahre Identität des Beklagten), unabdingbar für die Geltendmachung ihres Hauptanspruches (Lö-schung, Änderung der Eintragung, aber auch Schadensersatz) ist (z.B.: Cinepoly Records Com-pany limited &others vs. Hong Kong Broadband Net-work Limited & Others [2006] 1 HKLRD 255).

 

Dabei gilt es jedoch zu beachten, dass sich ein solcher Auskunftsanspruch nicht direkt aus dem Zivilprozessrecht ergibt, sondern es sich dabei um Richterrecht handelt, dass sich in der Vergangenheit aus älteren Urteilen gebildet hat. Demgemäß steht es im jeweiligen Ermessen des Richters, ob er dem geltend gemachten

 

 

 

Anspruch stattgibt. Weiterhin ist zu beachten, dass vor allem Auskunftsansprüche gegen Drit-te recht kostenintensiv sein können. So wird das erkennende Gericht regelmäßig eine Sicherheitsleistung des Klägers fordern, die zumindest so hoch ist, dass sie sowohl die wahrscheinlichen Kosten der dritten Partei zur Erlangung der Auskunft, als auch etwaige wei-tere Auslagen deckt.

 

  1. c) Unterlassungsanspruch

 

Weiterhin kann vor Gericht geltend gemacht werden, dass jemand eine bestimmte Handlung vornimmt oder eine bestimmte Handlung un-terlässt.

 

Hierfür kann ein Gericht auch einstweilige Verfügungen anordnen, zum Beispiel kann an-geordnet werden, dass es jemandem verboten wird, eine Immobilie oder anderes Eigentum zu veräußern, bis die endgültige Eigentumslage festgestellt wurde.

 

Als weiterer Anspruch kann die Herstellung ei-nes bestimmten Zustandes angeordnet werden. Dies ist vor allem bei Kaufverträgen der Fall, wenn die verkaufte Sache einen Mangel hat. Im Gegensatz zu kontinentaleuropäischem Recht ist der Primäranspruch des Käufers in solchen Fällen ein Schadensersatzanspruch. Dies hat den Hintergrund, dass im Common Law die Übereignung einer mangelhaften Sache eine so schwere Pflichtverletzung darstellt, dass dem Käufer nicht zugemutet werden kann an dem Vertrag festzuhalten. Der Verkäufer macht sich folglich, ohne ein Recht zur zweiten Andie-nung, schadensersatzpflichtig. Demgegenüber steht bspw. dem Käufer in Deutschland zu-nächst das Recht auf Nachbesserung bzw. Nachlieferung zu, sodass erst nach dem zwei-ten Andienungsversuch und bei Verschulden des Verkäufers eine Schadensersatzpflicht ent-stehen kann (sog. großer oder kleiner Scha-densersatz).

 

In Hongkong hingegen werden Nachbesserung bzw. Nachlieferung nur angeordnet, wenn eine finanzielle Entschädigung des Klägers nicht ausreichend ist, wenn er also z.B. beim Stückkauf ein sehr hohes Interesse an dem Erwerb eines bestimmten Gutes hat.

 

  1. Ablauf eines Gerichtsverfahrens

 

Ein Gerichtsverfahren läuft in folgenden Schritten ab:

 

  1. a) Anwaltsschreiben

 

Für die Einleitung eines Gerichtsverfahrens ist es in Hongkong nicht notwendig, dem Schuld-ner ein formales Anwaltsschreiben zukommen zu lassen. Dennoch empfiehlt sich dies als eine

 

Art „letzte Warnung“, um doch noch zu versu-chen, ein Gerichtsverfahren zu vermeiden und eine schnelle und kostengünstige Einigung zu erreichen.

 

  1. b) Klage

 

Soll kein Anwaltsschreiben verfasst werden, oder ist dies ohne Erfolg geblieben, so ist Kla-ge vor dem zuständigen Gericht zu erheben.

 

  1. c) Vertretung vor Gericht

 

(i) Grundsatz

 

Anders als in Deutschland besteht vor allen Hongkonger Gerichten kein Anwaltszwang. In Hongkong können sich sowohl in Zivilrechts-streitigkeiten als auch in strafrechtlichen Ver-fahren die Parteien bzw. die Angeklagten selbst vertreten. Neben dem Recht der Selbstver-tretung kann eine Partei ähnlich wie in Deutschland Prozesskostenhilfe beantragen.

 

(ii) Solicitors/ Barristers

 

Wie in Großbritannien ist die Rechtsanwalt-schaft in Hongkong in zwei große Gruppen ge-trennt: Solicitors und Barristers. Beide Grup-pen haben unterschiedliche gesetzliche Grund-lagen und Regelungen und sind auch in unter-schiedlichen Vereinigungen organisiert. Die Hauptunterschiede sind:

 

  • Solicitors können nur in Gerichten unter-halb des High Courts auftreten, während


 

 

Barrister vor allen Gerichten auftreten kön-nen.

 

  • Solicitors verkehren mit dem jeweiligen Mandanten, wohingegen Barrister sich auf die Vertretung vor Gericht, das Verfassen von Schriftsätzen und die Argumentation im Gerichtssaal spezialisieren.

 

  • Der Solicitor wird vom Mandanten beauf-tragt, wohingegen die Barristers durch den Solicitor und nicht durch den Mandanten beauftragt werden.

 

  • Der Barrister stellt seine Leistungen dem Solicitor in Rechnung. Dieser reicht diese dann an den Mandanten weiter und stellt seine eigenen Leistungen ebenfalls dem Mandanten in Rechnung.

 

  • Solicitors können alleine arbeiten oder sich in Personengesellschaften organisieren, wohingegen die meisten Barrister entweder alleine tätig sind, oder sich in sogenannten „Kammern“ zusammenschließen, um Kos-ten zu teilen.

 

Die Aufteilung in zwei verschiedene Berufs-zweige geht auf das historische England zu-rück. Das System wurde eingeführt, um vor Gericht mehr Gerechtigkeit zu erreichen, macht heutzutage aber eher wenig Sinn. In den meisten anderen Ländern (Deutschland, USA, Japan, etc.) findet sich eine solche Aufteilung nicht, da sie erhebliche Nachteile hat und kaum Vorteile bringt. Müssen sich zwei unabhängige Rechtsanwälte mit dem gleichen Fall beschäfti-gen, so fällt offensichtlich auch die doppelte Arbeit an, welche dann in Rechnung gestellt wird. Am Anfang beauftragt der Mandant sei-nen Solicitor, bespricht mit ihm den Fall und der Solicitor tritt mit der Gegenseite in Kon-takt, um den Streit unter Umständen gütlich zu beenden. Ist dies nicht möglich, so reicht der Solicitor Klage ein, stellt diese zu und fertigt weitere Schriftstücke im Zuge des Klageverfah-rens. Geht der Fall schlussendlich vor Gericht, so ist ein Barrister zu beauftragen, der sämtli-che Unterlagen nochmals durchschaut und sich mit dem Sachverhalt vertraut macht. Anschließend bespricht er den Fall mit dem Solicitor und übernimmt die Vertretung vor Gericht. In Hongkong ist es auch an der Tagesordnung, dass der Barrister zu Gericht vom Solicitor be-gleitet wird, da dieser sich mit dem Fall unter Umständen besser auskennt. Bedenkt man da-bei, dass sowohl der Solicitor dem Mandanten einen Stundensatz von 350 Euro aufwärts, als auch der Barrister einen Stundensatz von regel-mäßig über 500 Euro in Rechnung stellen, so kommt man schnell zu dem Ergebnis, dass hier Kosten entstehen, die zumindest zu 40% ver-meidbar wären.

 

  1. d) Antrag auf Liquidation

 

Schuldet der Beklagte dem Kläger einen Betrag von mindestens 10.000 HKD (ca. 1.000 Euro) kann der Kläger parallel zur Klageerhebung (oder auch nur) die Liquidation des Schuldners beantragen, wenn dieser eine juristische Person ist. Hierzu ist dem Schuldner eine Aufforde-rung zur Zahlung zuzustellen und wenn dieser der Aufforderung innerhalb von 21 Tagen nicht nachkommt, kann der Gläubiger bei Ge-richt einen Antrag auf Liquidation stellen. Dies hat den Vorteil, dass mit Stattgabe des Antrags durch das zuständige Gericht Vermögens-gegenstände des Schuldners gesichert werden können. Dabei gilt jedoch zu beachten, dass das Vermögen des Schuldners im Rahmen der Liquidation mit den anderen Gläubigern zu tei-len ist, so dass der Antragsteller unter Umstän-den nicht seinen vollen Betrag zurück erhält.

 

  1. Gerichtsaufbau in Hongkong von unten nach oben:

 

  1. a) Gerichte

 

Hongkong hat eine ganze Reihe von sogenann-ten „Tribunals“ eingerichtet, die jeweils auf ei-ne Art von Streitigkeiten spezialisiert sind. So gibt es etwas das „Employment Tribunal“, das sich ausschließlich mit Arbeitsrecht befasst, oder das „Small Claims Tribunal“, das sich mit

Streitigkeiten bis zu einem Gegenstandswert von 50.000 HKD (ca. 5.000 Euro) befasst. Die Prozessregeln für diese Tribunale sind nicht so streng wie vor ordentlichen Gerichten, in man-

 

 

 

chen Fällen ist es sogar verboten, sich durch ei-nen Rechtsanwalt vertreten zu lassen.

 

  1. b) Magistrates‘ Courts

 

Die Magistrates‘ Courts sind Strafgerichte, die sich mit Vergehen und Verbrechen bis zu einer Höchststrafe von 2 Jahren oder Geldstrafe von bis zu 100.000 HKD (ca. 10.000 Euro) befas-sen. Liegt die erwartete Strafe darüber, so wird der Fall vor dem District Court oder dem High Court verhandelt.

 

  1. c) District Courts

 

Die District Courts sind zuständig für Zivilver-fahren mit einem Gegenstandswert von 50.000 HKD bis 1.000.000 HKD (ca. 5.000 – 100.000 Euro). Darüber hinaus hat der District Court für manche Bereiche die ausschließliche Zu-ständigkeit. In diesem Fall ordnet das Gesetz die Zuständigkeit des Gerichts ausdrücklich an. Dazu gehören unter anderem (nach der Em-ployees’ Compensation Ordinance) alle An-sprüche der Arbeitnehmer gegenüber dem Ar-beitgeber. Ferner sind die District Courts Beru-fungsgericht für von den Tribunalen erlassene Urteile.

 

Sollte der Streitwert nur etwas über der Grenze von 1 Mio. HKD liegen, so ist es möglich, den Streitwert in der Klage zu reduzieren und so die Zuständigkeit des District Courts zu errei-chen, da dies niedrigere Kosten verursacht als eine Verhandlung vor dem nächst höheren Ge-richt.

 

  1. d) High Court

 

Unter High Court ist der Court of First In-stance und der Court of Appeal zu verstehen.

 

  1. e) Court of First Instance

 

Der Court of First Instance ist zuständig für sämtliche Zivil- und Strafsachen, soweit nicht ein niedrigeres Gericht zuständig ist. Weiterhin ist der Court of First Instance Berufungsge-richt für Verfahren der niedrigeren Gerichte.

 

  1. f) Court of Appeal

 

Der Court of Appeal ist ein reines Berufungs-gericht ohne originäre Zuständigkeit. Der Court of Appeal ist Berufungsgericht für vom Court of First Instance erlassene Urteile.

 

  1. g) Court of Final Appeal

 

Der Court of Final Appeal ist das höchste Hongkonger Gericht. Revisionen vor diesem Gericht sind zulässig, wenn sie von dem Aus-gangsgericht zugelassen worden sind, oder wenn Fragen von öffentlichem Interesse be-troffen sind. Die Richter am Court of Final Appeal werden, auf Vorschlag einer unabhän-gigen Kommission, vom Chief Executive (Hongkongs höchstem Beamten) ernannt. Ver-handlungen werden von drei dauerhaften und einem temporär berufenen Richter gehört. Der temporäre Richter muss nicht aus Hong-kong stammen, sondern kann aus jedem Land sein, in dem das Common Law gilt.

 

  1. h) Privy Council

 

Bis vor der Übergabe an China am 01. Juli 1997 war das höchste Hongkonger Gericht das Privy Council in London. Dies ist nun nicht mehr der Fall, auch wenn das Privy Council für andere Länder des Commonwealth noch im-mer das höchste Gericht ist. Dennoch bleiben Entscheidungen des Privy Council, die vor der Rückgabe Hongkongs an China ergangen sind, in Hongkong geltendes Recht.

 

  1. Der Ablauf eines Gerichtsverfahrens

 

  1. a) Vorverfahren

 

Wie bereits angesprochen, ist das Verfassen ei-nes Anwaltsschreibens oder einer Mahnung nicht nötig, aber empfehlenswert. Daneben können die Parteien auch durch außergerichtli-che Vereinbarungen versuchen, ein Gerichts-verfahren zu vermeiden.

 

 

 

  1. b) Einreichung der Klage

 

Die Klage wird durch die Einreichung eines sogenannten „Writ of Summons“ zum zustän-digen Gericht eingeleitet. Das Gericht über-prüft dieses Schriftstück, weist dem Fall eine Nummer zu, versieht das Dokument mit einem offiziellen Stempel und gibt es dem Kläger zu-rück. Dieses Dokument muss der Kläger dann innerhalb von 12 Monaten dem Beklagten zu-stellen.

 

Das Writ of Summons ist mit einer Klagebe-gründung zu versehen (General Indorsement of Claim, oder Statement of Claim).

 

Zu beachten ist, dass neu eingereichte Klagen zum Gericht grundsätzlich in lokalen Zeitun-gen veröffentlicht werden, mit dem Hinweis wer die Parteien sind und welcher Klagean-spruch in welcher Höhe geltend gemacht wird. Weiterhin ist zu beachten, dass viele Parteien gesetzlich verpflichtet sind, gegen sie einge-reichte Klagen Dritten mitzuteilen. Dies sind vor allem Banken, Behörden und Vertragspart-ner, die ein Interesse daran haben zu erfahren, dass gegen einen ihrer Vertragspartner Klage erhoben wurde. Diese Dritten werden dann den gegen ihren Vertragspartner geltend ge-machten Anspruch überprüfen (Höhe, Grund, Erfolgsaussichten) und entsprechend handeln. Dies kann die Kündigung von Darlehen, die Kündigung von Verträgen und die Einstellung von Dienstleistungen zur Folge haben, wenn diese Option im jeweiligen Vertrag vorgesehen wurde. Dadurch kann ein erheblicher Druck auf den Beklagten aufgebaut werden, wodurch viele Beklagte dazu veranlasst werden, eine au-ßergerichtliche Einigung zu erzielen, um weite-ren Nachteilen zu entgehen.

 

  1. c) Antwort des Beklagten

 

Innerhalb von 14 Tagen nach Zustellung der Klage muss der Beklagte den Erhalt der Klage bei Gericht bestätigen und er muss anzeigen, ob er sich hiergegen verteidigen möchte. Ist dies der Fall, hat er weitere 28 Tage Zeit, dem Kläger seine Klageerwiderung zuzustellen. Handelt es sich um einen Zahlungsanspruch, kann der Beklagte anstelle einer Klageerwide-rung auch einen Vorschlag machen, wie er den Betrag zahlen möchte. Der Kläger hat dann da-raufhin 14 Tage Zeit zu antworten.

 

  1. d) Versäumnisurteil

 

Versäumt es der Beklagte, den Erhalt der Klage zu bestätigen, oder versäumt es der Beklagte, rechtzeitig seine Klageerwiderung zuzustellen, so kann der Kläger ein Versäumnisurteil bean-tragen. Ist die Klage auf Zahlung eines be-stimmten Betrags gerichtet, kann das Gericht per Versäumnisurteil entscheiden, dass dieser Betrag zu zahlen ist. Handelt es sich um eine Klage auf einen unbestimmten Betrag, so kann der Kläger beantragen, dass das Gericht einen entsprechenden Betrag festsetzt und ein ent-sprechendes Urteil erlässt.

 

Ein Versäumnisurteil kann aufgehoben wer-den, wenn der Kläger einen Verfahrensfehler begangen hat (falsche Zustellung der Klage etc.). In allen andern Fällen wird das Versäum-nisurteil nur aufgehoben, wenn der Beklagte echte bzw. hohe Erfolgsaussichten hat.

 

  1. e) Widerklage

 

Der Beklagte kann zusammen mit seiner Kla-geerwiderung auch Widerklage erheben, gegen die der Kläger sich dann verteidigen muss. Tut der Kläger und Widerbeklagte dies nicht, läuft er Gefahr, dass gegen ihn ein Versäumnisurteil ergeht.

 

Abgesehen davon muss der Kläger auf die Klageerwiderung des Beklagten nicht antwor-ten. Eine Antwort empfiehlt sich hingegen, wenn vom Beklagten substantielle Vorwürfe oder Verteidigungen vorgebracht werden, die der Kläger dann entkräften sollte.

 

Der gesamte Austausch von Schriftsätzen wird als „Pleadings“ bezeichnet, die grundsätzlich von einem Barrister entworfen werden und dann vom Solicitor unterzeichnet und bei Ge-richt eingereicht werden.

 

 

 

  1. f) Urteil im Schnellverfahren

 

Ist der Kläger der Meinung dass der Klagean-spruch klar ist und keiner Diskussion bedarf, kann er einen Antrag auf ein Urteil im Schnell-verfahren (Summary Judgement) stellen. Folgt der Richter dieser Ansicht, hält er die Klage al-so für begründet und die Verteidigung für nicht substantiiert, so kann er ein solches Urteil erlassen. Diese Vorgehensweise geht gemein-hin erheblich schneller als eine komplette Ge-richtsverhandlung mit der Anhörung von Zeu-gen, etc.

 

  1. g) Vorläufiger Zeitplan

 

Nach Einreichung der Schriftsätze haben beide Seiten einen vorläufigen Zeitplan einzureichen, in dem sie unter anderem die nächsten Schritte mit den geplanten Daten nennen, aber auch schon ihre Zeugen und Gutachter benennen. Es empfiehlt sich, diesen Zeitplan zwischen den Parteien abzustimmen, bevor er bei Ge-richt eingereicht wird.

 

Nach Einreichung des Zeitplans bei Gericht muss seitens des Klägers innerhalb von weite-ren 14 Tagen ein sogenannter „Case Manage-ment Summons“ eingereicht werden, in dem vom Kläger weitere Einzelheiten wie zum Bei-spiel Beweiserhebung, etc. vorgeschlagen wer-den. Dies wird dann vom Gericht überprüft, bestätigt bzw. abgeändert und anschließend den Parteien zugestellt. Dieser Zeitplan ist ver-bindlich für den weiteren Verlauf des Prozes-ses und kann grundsätzlich nur aus wichtigem Grund und auf Antrag einer Partei abgeändert werden.

 

  1. h) Mediation

 

Seit 2010 ist es in Hongkong Pflicht, vor einem Gerichtsverfahren ein Mediationsverfahren durchzuführen. Hierzu gibt es zertifizierte Stel-len, bei denen neutrale Mediatoren angestellt sind und mit denen die Parteien zusammen treffen, um eine außergerichtliche Einigung zu erzielen. Eine nicht unerhebliche Anzahl von Streitigkeiten kann hierdurch schon beigelegt werden, bevor sich das Gericht mit diesen befasst. Ist eine Einigung nicht möglich, so stellt der Mediator eine Bescheinigung aus, die bei Gericht als Nachweis der gescheiterten Media-tion vorzulegen ist.

 

  1. i) Aufnahme in die Gerichtsliste

 

Ist die Mediation ergebnislos verlaufen und wurde der „Case Management Summons“ den Parteien zugestellt, so muss als nächstes der Kläger beim Gericht einen Antrag stellen, seine Klage in die Warteliste aufzunehmen. Hierzu ist die komplette Klageschrift nochmals bei Gericht einzureichen. Für Fälle, für die weniger als drei Verhandlungstage angesetzt werden, wird die „Running List“ geführt, für alle ande-ren umfangreicheren Prozesse wird die „Fic-ture List“. Bei Letzterer müssen beide Parteien vor einem Mitarbeiter des Gerichts erscheinen, der dann in Abstimmung mit beiden Parteien einen Termin für die mündliche Verhandlung festlegt. Für die Running List ist das Prozedere anders: Für diese wird einseitig vom Gericht ein Verhandlungstermin festgelegt. Wenn sich die Zeit bis zu diesem Termin auf zwei Monate verkürzt hat, wird die Klage in die „Pending List“ aufgenommen. Verkürzt sich die Zeit dann auf eine Woche, so kommt die Klage auf die „Warned List“. Es ist also nötig, dass die Parteien regelmäßig überprüfen, auf welcher Liste ihr Fall gerade ist, um durch eventuelle Terminverschiebungen, die den Parteien nicht mitgeteilt werden, zu verhindern, dass sie den Termin verpassen.

 

  1. j) Mündliche Verhandlung

 

Bei der mündlichen Verhandlung tragen die Barrister der beiden Parteien ihre Standpunkte vor und es werden Zeugen und Gutachter be-rufen und vom Gericht als auch von den Par-teien befragt. Hiernach wird vom Gericht das Urteil erlassen. Es ergeht aber in den seltensten Fällen ein Stuhlurteil, normalerweise wird das Urteil binnen einiger Tage nach der letzten Verhandlung zugestellt.

 

 

 

  1. k) Gütliche Einigung

 

Während der gesamten Verhandlung steht den Parteien die Möglichkeit offen, sich gütlich zu einigen.

 

Schlägt eine Partei den Antrag der anderen Par-tei, sich gütlich zu einigen, aus und stellt sich am Ende des Prozesses heraus, dass die aus-schlagende Partei im Urteil weniger erhält als sie durch den Vergleich erhalten hätte, so steht ihr keinerlei Anspruch auf Ersatz von Kosten zu. Dies soll die Parteien dazu bringen, sich Vergleichsangebote genau zu überlegen. Sollten sich die Parteien einigen, so muss der Vergleich nicht vom Gericht bestätigt werden. Allerdings wird das Gericht ein formales Schriftstück er-stellen, in dem der Vergleich protokolliert ist. Aus diesem Schriftstück kann die Vollstre-ckung betrieben werden.

 

  1. Dauer

 

Im Durchschnitt vergehen in Hongkong ca. 2 (!!) Jahre, ehe es zur mündlichen Verhandlung kommt. Die meiste Zeit wird dabei mit Warten auf den Termin zur mündlichen Verhandlung verbracht.

 

Die offizielle Statistik listet die Dauer (in Ta-gen) wie folgt:

 

 

2011

2012

2013

 

 

 

 

Fixture List

231

244

261

 

 

 

 

Running List

83

50

85

 

 

 

 

 

Ob eine solch lange Wartezeit bis zur mündli-chen Verhandlung noch als fair bezeichnet werden kann ist äußerst fraglich, zumindest eu-ropäische Gerichte haben in der Vergangenheit des Öfteren entschieden, dass eine zu lange Verfahrensdauer einen Verstoß gegen das Recht auf eine faire Verhandlung darstellt.

 

Darüber hinaus verursacht solch eine Wartezeit auch erhebliche praktische Probleme, da nach langer Wartezeit Gesellschaften schon liquidiert sein können, Personen Hongkong verlas-sen haben können, verstorben sein mögen oder sich schlicht nicht mehr erinnern können, was vor zwei Jahren wirklich passiert ist. Bis zu ei-nem finalen Urteil, möglicherweise über meh-rere Instanzen, können so bis zu 4 Jahre verge-hen, was die Rechtsdurchsetzung erheblich er-schwert, wenn nicht sogar unmöglich macht.

 

  • Kosten

 

  1. a) Anwaltskosten

 

Erfolgshonorare für Anwälte sind in Hong-kong aus gutem Grund verboten, so dass jede Seite ihre Kosten vorab selbst zu tragen hat.

 

Es gibt in Hongkong keine gesetzliche Vergü-tungsregelung für Anwälte, so dass Rechtsan-wälte ausschließlich auf Stundenbasis tätig wer-den. Eine „normale“ Zivilklage kann somit in

 

Hongkong ca. 15.000 – 50.000 Euro kosten, größere Fälle kosten aber leicht Beträge jenseits der 100.000 Euro Schwelle. Zu beachten ist, dass der Gewinner einer Klage auch bei 100%igem Obsiegen nicht seine kompletten Kosten erstattet bekommt, sondern lediglich 60% – 75%. Dies wird damit begründet, dass an einem Streit immer zwei schuld seien, so dass auch der Gewinner seinen Teil zu tragen habe.

 

  1. b) Gerichtskosten


 

 

  1. Vollstreckung

 

Sollte die unterliegende Partei die Erfüllung des Urteils verweigern, so stehen dem Gewinner folgende Möglichkeiten zu:

 

  • Eidesstattliche Versicherung über die Ver-mögenslage

 

  • Beschlagnahme des Vermögens

 

  • Abtretung von Forderungen gegen Dritte

 

  • Eintragung einer Hypothek oder eines Pfandrechts

 

  • Antrag, einen Vermögensverwalter einzu-stellen, der die Schulden des Schuldners ordnet und abwickelt

 

  • Übergabe von Eigentum oder Dokumen-ten an das Gericht

 

  • Anweisung des Gerichts, dass der Gläubi-ger befugt ist, eine bestimmte Handlung für den Schuldner vorzunehmen

 

  • Jede andere Möglichkeit, die dem Gericht angemessen erscheint

 

Die meisten der oben genannte Möglichkeiten werden durch den Gerichtsvollzieher (Bailiff’s Office) durchgeführt, ansonsten ist das Gericht zuständig.

 

III. Weitere Möglichkeiten zur Streit-beilegung

 

  1. Arbitration


 

Die Gerichtskosten sind recht gering und set-zen sich wie folgt zusammen:

 

 

High Court

District Court

 

 

 

Für  Writ  of

1.045 HKD

630 HKD

Summons

(100 EUR)

(60 EUR)

Gerichts-

1.045 HKD

630 HKD

verhandlung

(100 EUR)

(60 EUR)

 

Darüber hinaus können noch Kosten für Übersetzungen und andere Gebühren hinzu-kommen, die aber in der Regel überschaubar sind.

 

Neben einer Gerichtsverhandlung und der Pflicht zur Mediation besteht die Möglichkeit, sich einer außergerichtlichen Schiedsgerichts-barkeit zu unterwerfen (Arbitration), was meist durch Parteivereinbarung in dem jeweiligen Vertragsdokument erfolgt. Die Rechtsgrund-lage hierzu bildet die Hong Kong Arbitration Ordinance (Cap. 609). Grundsätzlich kann jede Form von Arbitration zwischen den Parteien vereinbart werden, am Gängigsten ist aber die Hong Kong International Arbitration Commis-sion (HKIAC). Für Verträge mit chinesischen Parteien kann alternativ auch die China Inter-national Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission (CIETAC) mit Sitz entweder in Schanghai oder Peking vereinbart werden. Fer-ner steht es den Parteien frei, eine neutrale Schiedsordnung/einen neutralen Ort, zum Bei-spiel bei der International Chamber of Com-merce (ICC) in Paris festzulegen.

 

  1. Schlichtungsverfahren

 

Ein Schlichtungsverfahren bezeichnet den Ver-such einer unabhängigen dritten Person, die sich jeweils alleine mit einer der Parteien trifft, den Streit beizulegen. Diese Möglichkeit ist al-lerdings eher wenig populär, da es keinen Zwang gibt, den Streit zu beenden. Sollten sich die Parteien nicht einigen, so muss trotzdem der ordentliche Rechtsweg eingeschlagen wer-den.

 

  1. Zusammenfassung

 

Wie Sie aus dem Vorangegangenen sehen, können Rechte und Ansprüche in Hongkong auf verschiedene Weise durchgesetzt werden. Den Schwerpunkt des Newsletters bildet die Rechtsverfolgung durch ordentliche Gerichte, da diese Art der Durchsetzung die häufigste Form darstellt. Demgegenüber sollten jedoch alternative Methoden der Streitbeilegung, ins-besondere die Mediation und die Schiedsge-richtsbarkeit, vor dem Betreiben eines Rechts-streits stets berücksichtigt werden, da das Hongkonger Rechtssystem einige schwerwie-gende Nachteile aufweist. So ist das Betreiben eines Rechtsstreits regelmäßig erst ab einem Streitwert von 100.000 Euro rentabel. Die wesentlichen Nachteile des Hongkonger Rechts-systems sind:

 

  1. Es ist sehr langsam.

 

  1. Es ist teuer.

 

  1. Die Kosten der obsiegenden Partei werden nicht vollständig durch die an-dere Partei getragen.

 

  1. Das Solicitor / Barrister System führt zu einer erheblichen Doppelarbeit (ho-he Kosten) und ist veraltet.

 

Sollte Hongkong diese Nachteile nicht zeitnah in Griff bekommen, dürfte die Sonderverwal-tungszone in naher Zukunft von anderen asi-atischen Städten (wie zum Beispiel dem Erzri-valen Singapur) outperformt werden. Denn für die meisten Investoren ist neben einem hervor-ragenden Finanz- und Wirtschaftsstandort auch ein funktionstüchtiges und vor allem ef-fizientes sowie kostengünstiges Rechtssystem ausschlaggebend. Ferner droht auch mittler-weile Konkurrenz von Seiten der Volksrepu-blik China. So konnte diese in den letzten Jah-ren viele Missstände unter anderem durch den Erlass neuer Gesetze und der Einstellung jun-ger und rechtstreuer Richter beheben. Vor die-sem Hintergrund erscheint es als nicht unwahr-scheinlich, dass viele Investoren zukünftig di-rekt in China und nicht mehr in Hongkong in-vestieren, wo sie im Vergleich viel höhere Miet- und Lohnkosten und ein veraltetes Rechtssystem erwartet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter No. 143 (EN)

 

 

 

 

 

How to Enforce Your Rights in Hong Kong

 

 

 

 

February 2015

 

 

 

 

 

Table of Content

 

  1. INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………………………………………………. 3

 

  1. COURT PROCEEDINGS IN HONG KONG………………………………………………….. 3

 

  1. What Kinds of Rights are Enforceable?…………………………………………………………….. 3

 

  1. General Procedure For Commencing A Claim…………………………………………………… 5

 

  1. The Hong Kong Court System………………………………………………………………………… 6

 

  1. Key Stages in a Court Case……………………………………………………………………………… 7

 

  1. Time………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 10

 

  1. Costs………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11

 

III     ENFORCING A JUDGMENT…………………………………………………………………….. 12

 

  1. ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION…………………………………………………. 12

 

  1. CONCLUSION………………………………………………………………………………………….. 14

 

 Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information provid-ed. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qual-ified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, includ-ing any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliber-ately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

 

In 2008 Hong Kong’s judicial system was voted the best in Asia in a survey of expatriate business executives.1 This is the culmination of two hundred years of modern legal devel-opment.

 

During the colonial era the British introduced a common law system and court structure which was a key factor in the development of the island from a trading post to a major fi-nancial and commerce centre. Under the “one country, two systems” doctrine, which was es-tablished upon the hand-over to China on 01 July 1997, the majority of the pre-1997 legal infrastructure, regulations and mechanisms re-main intact, allowing Hong Kong to retain its reputation as a stable, comprehensive, trans-parent and reliable legal system.

 

However, as will be seen, the Hong Kong le-gal system is one of the slowest and most ex-pensive legal systems when compared to other jurisdictions. Furthermore, the Hong Kong legal system cannot truly be called “fair” be-cause even the party who wins the case com-pletely may not be able to recover its entire le-gal costs. As such, financially strong parties can force the other party to continue the bat-tle in the courts until the other party runs out of money.

 

This newsletter is designed to provide an overview of the current Hong Kong legal sys-tem and to provide a brief introduction as to

 

1 Conducted by the Political and Economic Risk Consultan-cy.

 

 

how this system can assist you to enforce your rights.

 

  1. Court Proceedings in Hong Kong

 

  1. What Kinds of Rights are Enforce-able?

 

(1) Suing for a monetary payment

 

Any person or entity which is owed a sum of money may bring a claim in the appro-priate Hong Kong court (please see Sec-tion II.3) against the debtor. Alternatively creditors may consider bringing winding up proceedings (please see Section II.2) against the debtor or trying alternative dis-pute resolution methods (please see Sec-tion IV) in order to get their money back.

 

(2) Suing for information

 

It is often the case that one person wants to obtain information from another person which that second person is not willing to disclose. Currently Hong Kong has no standalone right to sue someone for in-formation.

 

However, the rules of Pre-action Discov-ery allow one potential party to obtain in-formation from another potential party or even a third party on the basis that such information will help to settle or establish the existence of a potential underlying claim.

 

 a) Against a Potential Party

 

An application for Pre-action Discovery against a potential party can be brought before the Court when the applicant (usually the potential Plaintiff) can show that:

 

  • It has, at least on the surface, a legitimate claim against the respondent;

 

  • The documents requested would fall within the scope of standard disclosure in any subsequent proceedings. In other words they are documents which the party would be required to disclose anyway during any subsequent legal proceedings; and

 

  • It is “desirable” to make such an order. Whether the order is “desirable” will depend on the facts of the case at hand. However whether the disclosure will make a settlement more likely is usually a key factor in making this determination.

 

  1. b) Against a Non-Party

 

An applicant can also bring an application against a non-party for Pre-Action Disclosure if:

 

  • The respondent is not a potential De-fendant but they are involved or “mixed up” in a wrongdoing and thus have information and/or documentation that is critical to the applicant’s claim. Usually the third party is innocent and sometimes is not even aware of the wrongdoing;

 

  • They are likely to have relevant documents or information; and

 

  • It is in the interests of justice to make such an order.


Most of the recent cases regarding such orders concern forcing Internet Service Providers to hand over user information for online defamation claims. Within these cases, the need to establish whether a claim exists and the identity of the correct defendant have been accepted as legitimate reasons for making such an order (e.g.

 

Cinepoly Records Company limited &others vs. Hong Kong Broadband Network Limited & Others [2006] 1 HKLRD 255)

 

As this is an equitable rather than statutory remedy, whether an order is granted is at the discretion of the judge. Further, these applications can be expensive because the Court usually requires the applicant to cover the respondent’s application and disclosure costs. This is because the applicant usually does not have any pre-existing right to the information requested. Therefore the non-party’s refusal to dis-close the information earlier should not lead to a cost order against them. By ex-tension the innocent non-party should also not be made to bear the cost of collecting and disclosing information in regards to a dispute which does not directly concern them.

 

(3) To compel somebody in Hong Kong to commit or refrain from commit-ting a specific act

 

The Hong Kong courts can grant either a mandatory or prohibitive injunction which will compel a person/company to commit or refrain from a specific act respectively.

 

Injunctions can be made in support of an underlying claim e.g. an injunction not to dispose of certain property until ownership rights have been ascertained. Alternatively the injunction can be the end object of the proceedings, e.g. to retain possession over land by compelling an occupant to vacate.

 

Moreover, a party to a contract can apply for the equitable remedy of specific performance if the other party defaults on their agreement. If the application is approved then the default-ing party will be required to perform their original promise under the contract in ques-tion. Unlike in civil law jurisdictions, e.g. Germany, where specific performance is the plaintiff’s primary remedy, with other rights (e.g. reduction of price, annulment of the con-tract, etc) only being granted if specific per-formance is not possible, specific performance in Hong Kong is only granted where the Court believes that monetary damages would not be enough to remedy the breach in ques-tion. Such orders usually involve land or other unique property.

 

 

  1. General procedure for commencing a claim

 

(1)  Letter  Before   Action  and   Letter  of

Claim

 

In contrast to other jurisdictions (e.g. the “Mahnbescheid” in Germany), there is cur-rently no requirement under Hong Kong law to serve a Letter of Claim or Letter Before Ac-tion upon an intended Defendant (except in personal injury cases). Such letters are how-ever recommended as they provide the in-tended Defendant with an opportunity to co-operate or make a settlement offer before the courts (and related costs) become involved thus saving both parties’ time and money.

 

(2)   Litigation

 

If the Letter Before Action/Letter of Claim and any other negotiation attempts have failed and the other party is not willing to cooperate, then the person whose rights have been in-fringed should consider commencing litigation proceedings (please see Section II.4).

 

 

 

(3)   Legal Representation

 

  1. a) Availability

 

All parties in criminal or civil proceedings have the right to act on their own behalf (with some exceptions for corporate bod-ies) or to appoint a solicitor to represent them. Please note that if a party chooses to represent themselves they can appear in any court or tribunal in Hong Kong. They are not obligated to appoint a barrister and they are not subject to the same appearance restrictions as a solicitor (as detailed below). If a party wants but can-not afford legal representation then they can apply for legal aid.

 

  1. b) Solicitors vs Barristers

 

The legal profession in Hong Kong is split into 2 branches (which mirror the UK sys-tem): solicitors and barristers. The two professions require different qualifications, and are regulated by different authorities and have very different roles to play in the overall legal system. The key differences between the two professions are as follows:

 

  • Solicitors can only appear in the lower courts (below the High Court) whereas barristers can appear in any court;

 

  • Barristers specialize in courtroom ad-vocacy, drafting legal pleadings and giving expert legal opinions. Whereas solicitors deal with the client and carry out transactional-type legal work.

 

  • Barristers are hired by the solicitor, not by the client, and in most cases have little or no direct contact with the client.

 

  • Solicitors bill the client directly. Whereas barristers bill the instructing solicitor who then passes the cost onto the client.

 

  • Solicitors practice as sole practitioners, or in partnerships. Barristers are almost always self-employed although many choose to form ‘chambers’ in order to share administrative and operating expenses with other barristers.

 

This system of solicitors and barristers dates back to the historic days of middle- age England, but arguably does not make sense nowadays. In most other jurisdictions (USA, Germany, Japan, etc.) there is only one legal profession which advises the client, and represents them at court. The solicitor/barrister system causes substantial duplication of work, as the solicitor must review the client’s case in order to prepare the requisite advice and documents, and then the same procedure must be repeated by the barrister, in order to prepare for court. This causes the client to pay for the same service twice, as he must first pay the solicitor (hourly rate: 350 Euro and up), and then the barrister (hourly rate: 550 Euro and up) for the same work. Equally it is common for the solicitor to accompany the barrister to court, thus the client also needs to pay double for any court hearing or final trial.

 

(4) Winding Up

 

Any creditor who is owed a liquidated sum of over HK$ 10,000 (approx. EUR 1,000) and who believes that the debtor company is un-able to pay the same can serve a statutory de-mand for payment upon them. If the debt re-mains unpaid for over 21 days then the credi-tor can serve a winding up petition to dissolve the debtor company. While often effective, these petitions should only be served after careful consideration. If the debtor company is dissolved then the creditor will have to share any recovered funds/assets with all the debtor company’s other creditors.

 

  1. The Hong Kong Court System

 

(1) Tribunals

 

Hong Kong’s tribunal system deals with numerous matters which require either specialist knowledge (e.g. Labour Tribunal) or which are considered too small to war-rant the use of court resources. For exam-ple the Small Claims Tribunal hears all monetary claims for less than HK$ 50,000 (EUR 5,000). The rules and procedures for tribunals are less strict than in most other courts and sometimes no legal repre-sentation is allowed.

 

(2) Magistrates’ Courts

 

Magistrates deal exclusively with criminal matters which include both summary and indictable offences. Crimes for which the sentence is over 2 years’ imprisonment and a fine of over HK$ 100,000 (EUR 10,000) are transferred to the District or High Court after the initial summary hearing.

 

(3) District Court

 

The District Court has civil jurisdiction over monetary claims of HK$ 50,000 – HK$ 1 million (EUR 5,000 – 100,000). Further, the District Court has exclusive jurisdiction over certain matters such as claims under the Employees’ Compensa-tion Ordinance (Cap 282). Further, the District Court can hear appeals from tri-bunals and statutory bodies where specifi-cally stated in the applicable ordinance.

 

If a claim is valued at only slightly over HK$ 1 million (approx. EUR 100,000), then the excess can be abandoned to bring the claim within the District Court’s juris-diction where costs are generally lower than the High Court.

 

 

  • High Court

 

The Hong Kong High Court is the collective name for the Court of First Instance and the Court of Appeal.

 

(5) Court of First Instance

 

The Court of First Instance has unlimited civil and criminal jurisdiction. The Court of First Instance is also permitted to hear appeals from the Magistrates’ Courts, the Labour Tri-bunal, the Small Claims Tribunal and the Ob-scene Articles Tribunal.

 

(6) Court of Appeal

 

The Court of Appeal hears all appeals from the Court of First Instance, District Court, and the Lands Tribunal. It can also issue rul-ings on questions of law which are referred to it by the lower courts. It has no primary juris-diction.

 

  • Court of Final Appeal

 

The Court of Final Appeal is, as the name suggests, the final appellate court for Hong Kong. The judges of the Court of Final Ap-peal are appointed by the Chief Executive, on the basis of recommendations from an inde-pendent commission. These appointments must be endorsed by the Legislative Council. Appeals are heard by the Chief Justice plus three permanent judges and one non-permanent Hong Kong judge or one judge from another common law jurisdiction.

 

(8) Judicial Committee of the Privy Council

 

The UK Judicial Committee of the Privy Council acts as the highest court of appeal for British overseas territories, Crown de-pendencies and several Commonwealth countries. Before 1997 the Privy Council was the highest court for all Hong Kong cases and

 

their decisions would bind the lower Hong Kong courts. Since the handover, the Privy Council no longer hears Hong Kong cases. However pre-1997 Hong Kong related decisions remain part of the common law of Hong Kong (i.e. are binding on lower courts) unless and until they are overturned by the Court of Final Appeal.

 

  1. Key Stages in a Court Case

 

(1) Pre-action steps

 

As noted above, it is customary (but not obligatory) for a “Letter of Claim” to be served upon a potential Defendant before an official claim is issued in order to pro-vide them with an opportunity to meet the Plaintiff’s demands without going to court.

 

The parties can also consider using alterna-tive dispute resolution (please see Section IV) to settle their dispute. Litigation should be a last resort.

 

(2) Commencing a Claim

 

A Plaintiff officially initiates their claim by filing a Writ of Summons and fee payment at the applicable court. The Court will re-view, number, stamp and then return the Writ to the Plaintiff. The Plaintiff must serve the Writ upon the Defendant within 12 months.

 

The Writ of Summons which is filed and served by the Plaintiff must be indorsed with either a General Indorsement of Claim or a Statement of Claim. The for-mer is a concise statement of the nature of the claim made or the relief or remedy sought by the Plaintiff, whereas the latter is a full statement of claim and must com-ply with court rules (Order 18).

 

Where a General Indorsement of Claim is used, the full Statement of Claim must be served within 14 days after the Defendant serves their Acknowledgment of Service.

 

Newly issued High Court legal actions are generally reported in major local newspaper and websites. Such reports usually briefly de-tail the nature of claim and the amount in dis-pute.

 

Further, Defendants are often compelled by contractual and/or regulatory requirements to report such legal action to related third parties such as the government, banks, law-enforcement agencies and most importantly, business associates with whom they maintain an on-going contractual relationship.

 

Such third parties frequently require the De-fendant to provide a detailed description of the claim and the available defences. The third parties will then internally assess the De-fendant’s financial capability, likelihood of success and, if appropriate, take contrac-tual/regulatory action against the Defendant in order to protect their own interests, e.g. call in loans, suspend contractual services etc. It is this external pressure which leads most De-fendants to seek a settlement with the Plaintiff unless the claim is truly frivolous.

 

(3) Acknowledgement of Service and Defense

 

Within 14 days of the date of service of the Writ, the Defendant must file the ac-knowledgment of service form at the Court Registry, either by post or in person. The De-fendant, upon giving notice of intention to de-fend, must serve a defense on the Plaintiff and on every other party to the action before the expiration of 28 days after the deadline for fil-ing the acknowledging service or after the ser-vice of the statement of claim, whichever is the latter.


(4) Admission

 

If the claim is for a monetary payment then the Defendant may file an admission and/or repayment proposal instead of a Defense. The Plaintiff has 14 days to re-spond. This response can accept the ad-mission and proposal or it can just accept the admission and request that the Court determines the payment terms.

 

(5) Default Judgment

 

If the Defendant does not file the ac-knowledgment and/or Defense by the rel-evant deadline then the Plaintiff can apply for a judgment in default. If the claim is for a liquidated amount then an order will be made for the amount claimed and costs. If the claim is for an unliquidated amount then an interlocutory judgment on liability will be entered against the Defendant and the Plaintiff can then ask the Court to as-sess the amount of damages which they are entitled to.

 

A Default Judgment will be set aside if it is found that the Plaintiff did not abide by the relevant procedurals rules (e.g. the Writ was not correctly served upon the De-fendant). In all other cases the Default Judgment will only be set aside if the De-fense has a “real prospect of success”.

 

(6) Reply and Defense to Counterclaim

 

Upon receipt of the Defense the Plaintiff has 28 days to file a Reply or a Defense to any Counterclaim raised by the Defendant.

 

It should be noted that a Plaintiff may not advance by way in their Defense to Coun-terclaim any allegations which are in-consistent with their Statement of Claim. If no Defense to the Counterclaim is re-ceived then the Defendant may apply for a Default Judgment thereon. The contents of these documents must be verified by a state-ment of truth.

 

A Reply is not compulsory or always necessary. It is only required in appropriate circumstanc-es where the Plaintiff wishes to respond to al-legations made in the Defense and to rely up-on such responses throughout the claim.

 

The Writ, Statement of Claim, Defense, Reply and Defense to Counterclaim (if any) are col-lectively referred to as “pleadings” and are usually drafted by a barrister and then signed and submitted by the party’s solicitor. Steps 2 – 6 above are collectively referred to as the “pleadings stage” which closes 14 days after the Plaintiff’s Reply is served upon the Defen-dant.

 

(7) Summary Judgment

 

If the Plaintiff believes that the Defendant has no reasonable grounds for refuting their claim then they can apply for a summary judgment. A summary judgment will be granted if the judge having reviewed the pleadings deter-mines that there are no triable issues, i.e. where the Defense is not supported by any reasonable grounds, concrete evidence or ar-guable points. The summary judgment hearing is much faster and cheaper than a trial.

 

(8) Timetabling Questionnaire

 

A Timetabling Questionnaire must be com-pleted and filed by each party within 28 days of the close of pleadings stage. This timetable will set out all the dates and deadlines for all the remaining stages of the proceedings. It will also set out the name and details of any lay or expert witnesses which the party wishes to rely upon at trial. The parties are strongly encour-aged to confer and agree upon the desired timetable before submitted the Questionnaire to the Court.

 

(9) Mediation

 

Mediation is a process through which an independent mediator assists the parties to reach an out of court settlement.

 

Since 2010 the parties are obligated under Practice Direction No.31 to file and serve a Mediation Certificate along with the Timetabling Questionnaire which indicates whether they intend to use mediation to resolve their dispute. If the parties do not intend to use mediation the reasons for this decision must be given. Adverse cost orders may apply at the end of the case if the judge feels that the stated reasons were unjustified.

 

(10) Case Management Summons

 

The Plaintiff must submit a case manage-ment summons to the court within either

 

14   days   of   receiving   the   Defendant’s

Timetabling Questionnaire or within 14 days of the deadline for filing the Time-tabling Questionnaire (whichever is earlier). This summons will ask the Court to give directions relating to the management of the case.

 

These directions will include all the steps that need to be taken to prepare the case for trial. The directions will also set the dates for the case management conference, pre-trial review and/or the trial. Once is-sued the parties must comply with the Court’s directions. Extensions of time will only be granted if there are “sufficient grounds”. Moreover, if the Plaintiff misses one of the set court dates then their claim may be struck out.

 

(11) Discovery

 

The above mentioned directions will in-clude the deadline by which each side must disclose to the other a list of the documents, or other materials, which they intend to rely on to prove their claim/defense. The other side will then review the list and submit an in-spection request for the specific documents or materials which they wish to see.

 

(12) Listing for Trial

 

Once the directions have been completed, the Plaintiff will file an application to the Court to have the case listed for trial. This application must be supported by the Plaintiff’s trial bun-dle (i.e. a copy of all the documents and other items they intend to rely on at trial) and a fee will be payable.

 

The case will then be assigned to either the Running List (for trials that are not intended to last longer than three days) or the Fixture List (all other cases or exceptional cases). For cases in the Fixture List an appointment must be made with the Listing Officer. Both parties must attend this appointment at which the Listing Officer will fix the trial date. For the Running List the parties will be informed of the estimated trial date. If the case is due to be heard within the next month it will be moved to the Pending List. If the case is due to be heard within the next week it will be moved to the Warned List. Therefore, it is essential that the parties routinely check these lists in order to obtain the exact trial date. The Pending List is displayed at Court and the Warned List is displayed at Court and online.

 

(13) Trial Hearing

 

ment. This judgment may be delivered at the end of the trial or it may be issued at later date if the Court needs more time for further deliberation.

 

  • Settlement, Payments into Court and Consent Orders

 

Throughout the entire duration of the liti-gation process the parties are urged to use their best efforts to come to an amicable settlement. Such settlements save the time, money, mental stress and resources of eve-ryone involved.

 

Aside from negotiation and other dispute resolution methods, either side may make a formal offer to settle at any time. If the other side accepts the offer then the case will settle. The settlement does not need to be approved by a judge. If the other side rejects the offer then the terms thereof will be kept secret until the end of the trial. If the final judgment is less favorable than the offer then the winning party will not be entitled to any legal costs which were incurred after the last day that the offer could have been accepted.

 

If a settlement is reached then the parties must notify the Court and apply for a Consent Order to be issued. The Consent Order will reflect the terms of the settle-ment and provides each side with valuable security as such orders can be enforced in the same way as a trial judgment.

 

  1. Time


 

At the trial, the barristers will present their party’s evidence and arguments to the Court. The Court will consider oral and written evi-dence from both lay and expert witnesses. The length and exact content of any trial depend on the circumstances of the case at hand. Once all the evidence and arguments have been presented, the Court will issue its judg-

 

On average it takes at least two years (!!) for a simple case in Hong Kong to come to trial; this does not include pre -trial steps. The exact time will depend on the com-plexity of the case, whether summary judgment is possible, whether interim ap-plications are required etc. Unfortunately a large portion of this timescale is waiting for the trial date, as can be seen in these Judi-ciary figures:

 

 

 

Days

 

 

2011

2012

2013

Civil Fixture List –

231

244

261

Application to fix

 

 

 

date to hearing

 

 

 

Civil Running List-

83

50

85

Setting down of a

 

 

 

case to hearing

 

 

 

 

A timeline for a case for at least two years cannot be called fair, is not acceptable in modern jurisdictions, and is a clear drawback for Hong Kong compared to other countries, such as Singapore, Taiwan or Mainland China, where cases come before the court in six to nine months.

 

A timeline of two years means that wrong-doing in Hong Kong is often not punished, because after two years, companies close down, people absconded from Hong Kong, or pass away, witnesses’ memories become unre-liable and evidence disappears.

 

  1. Costs

 

(1) Lawyers’ Fees

 

Conditional fees (a.k.a. “no win, no fee” ar-rangements) are currently not permitted in Hong Kong. Further, Hong Kong solicitors are prohibited from entering into contingency fee arrangements for litigious matters. The re-sult of these two rules is that anyone who re-quires legal representation in a court case (whether Plaintiff, Defendant or third party) must pay their own legal fees up front (unless Legal Aid applies).

 

Solicitors and barristers charge on an hourly rate basis which varies according to seniority and experience. It is extremely unusual for a solicitor or barrister to agree to a flat fee for a litigation case. Due to the varied na-

 

ture of litigation work it is impossible to give any “average” fee information.

 

For example a large commercial dispute case which goes to trial could lead to fees of HK$ 2.5 – 5 million (EUR 250,000 – 500,000). Alternatively, an interim injunc-tion application could incur costs of HK$ 400,000 – 700,000 (EUR 40,000 – 70,000).

 

(2) Court Fees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

District

 

High Court

Court

 

 

 

Issuing   Writ

HK$1,045

HK$ 630

of Summons

(EUR 100)

(EUR 60)

Setting    case

HK$1,045

HK$ 630

down for trial

(EUR 100)

(EUR 60)

 

The following court fees may also be in-curred depending on the case in question;

 

  1. Translation;

 

  1. Certification;

 

  1. Service fee; etc

 

(3) Recoupment of Costs

 

In Hong Kong the losing party is usually ordered to pay the winning party’s costs. However, the “costs” which are payable are not the same as the costs which the winning party has actually incurred. In-stead, the amount payable is assessed by the Court via a process known as “taxation of legal costs”. Under taxation the losing party will only be required to pay the win-ning party’s “reasonable costs” as deter-mined by the Court. Due to this process the winning party usually only recovers 50 – 75 % of their actual legal expenses. Inter-im costs orders can also be made during the litigation process, e.g. wasted costs or-ders for failing to meet a deadline or interim application costs such as for Pre-Action Discovery.

 

III Enforcing a Judgment

 

If the losing party (the judgment debtor) re-fuses to abide by the terms of the judgment or settlement then the following enforcement options are available:

 

  • Examination of the debtor under oath to obtain information on available assets;

 

  • Seizure of the debtor’s goods or land;

 

  • An order requiring a third party who owes a debt to the judgment debtor to pay the winning party (the judgment creditor) in-stead;

 

  • A charge on land or other property in fa-vour of the judgment creditor;

 

  • Appointment of a receiver to manage the judgment debtor’s property and/or busi-ness in order to raise funds to pay the judgment debt;

 

  • Committal for contempt of court;

 

  • An order empowering the judgment credi-tor or a third party to do what the judg-ment debtor should have done under the original judgment; and

 

  • Any other order which is appropriate un-der the circumstances

 

All enforcement proceedings must go through either the Court or the Bailiff’s Office (de-pending on which method is chosen). For ex-ample, a judgment creditor cannot turn up at the judgment debtor’s house and seize his goods. Instead, the judgment creditor must contact the Bailiff’s Office and follow the ap-plicable procedures.

 

  1. Alternative Dispute Resolution

 

  1. Arbitration

 

Hong Kong has a long arbitration history and the Hong Kong International Arbitra-tion Centre has been a hub for the settle-ment of cross-border disputes for decades. The legal framework for arbitration in Hong Kong can be found in the Arbitra-tion Ordinance (Cap 609).

 

Under the Ordinance any dispute can be settled via arbitration so long as a valid ar-bitration agreement is in place. If such an agreement does exist and one party brings a court claim against the other then the said other party can apply to have the pro-ceedings stayed until arbitration has been undertaken or the agreement is shown to be invalid.

 

Parties to arbitration may represent them-selves or appoint an advocate (not neces-sarily a legal professional).

 

Arbitrators can grant interim measures such as injunctions. Further an arbitration order can be enforced in the same way as a Court judgment. In terms of time and money arbitration is usually significantly faster than court proceedings but not nec-essarily cheaper. Costs include the arbi-trators’ fees, representation fees, venue fees etc.

 

  1. Conciliation

 

Conciliation is where an independent third party meets with the parties separately in order to better identify the issues to be re-solved, reduce tension, improve communi-cation and explore solutions. The results are not binding and cannot be enforced like a court order. Conciliation can be con-ducted privately or through an institution uch as the Hong Kong International Arbi-tration Centre.

 

  1. Conclusion

 

As can be seen from the above, there are a va-riety of options for those wishing to enforce their rights in Hong Kong. Litigation has been the focus of this newsletter as it is the most well-known form of dispute settlement and because of the reputability of the Hong Kong Court system. However, alternative methods of dispute resolution such as mediation and arbitration should always be seriously consid-ered, as the Hong Kong court system does have some significant drawbacks which make it undesirable to start legal proceedings, for sums under EUR 100,000. The main draw-backs of the Hong Kong legal system are:

 

  1. It is very slow.

 

  1. It is expensive.

 

  1. Legal fees cannot be recovered com-pletely.

 

  1. The solicitor/barrister system causes substantial duplication of work and is outdated.


If Hong Kong does not address these drawbacks, then it may soon be outper-formed by other Asian cities (such as its longtime rival Singapore), as investors in Hong Kong become more and more afraid that they will not be able to enforce their legal rights. Furthermore, in light of Mainland China’s legal system reforms (such as new laws being implemented and new and young judges being hired), it may soon be the case that investors will con-sider investing directly into China, instead of Hong Kong, where they face higher rents, higher labour costs and have to rely on an arguably outdated legal system.

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 144 (DE)